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Reduce Tobacco Use

ACPM members are engaged in reducing tobacco use at the individual and population level through various ways: Advocating policy, developing position statements and implementing CDC grants to advance federal initiatives.

Policy

Tobacco 21 Policy Statement

FY2017 Sign-on letter for FDA regulation of e-cigarettes

FY2017 Sign-on letter for CDC's Office of Smoking and Health

Position Statements

Policies to Restrict Secondhand Smoke Exposure: American College of Preventive Medicine Position Statement

Programs

Addressing the Role of Physicians in CDC’s 6|18 Initiative

Diabetes Prevention

ACPM has recently received a grant from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Office of State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS) to address HST through CDC’s 6|18 initiative. Through 6|18, CDC is targeting six common and costly health conditions – tobacco use, high blood pressure, healthcare-associated infections, asthma, unintended pregnancies, and diabetes – and 18 proven specific interventions that formed the starting point of discussions with purchasers, payers, and providers.

 

Lifestyle Medicine Core Curriculum 
ACPM and the American College of Lifestyle Medicine (ACLM) are proud to introduce the Lifestyle Medicine Core Competencies Program, a new comprehensive, evidence-based curriculum designed for physicians with an interest in learning the basic principles of lifestyle medicine.

 

The curriculum has several modules that address tobacco use, including:


DID YOU KNOW? In a recent survey of PM physicians, 48% said they refer patients to, and/or advocate for expansion of evidence-based tobacco cessation treatments, including individual, group, and telephone counseling and FDA-approved cessation medications.


Recent Research

CDC’s Vital Signs – Cancer and Tobacco

3 in 4 Teens Think E-cigarettes are Safer than Tobacco


Awareness Campaigns

Great American Smokeout
The Great American Smokeout


Every year, on the third Thursday of November, smokers across the nation take part in the American Cancer Society Great American Smokeout event. By quitting – even for 1 day – smokers will be taking an important step toward a healthier life and reducing their cancer risk. Getting help through counseling or medications can double or triple the chances of quitting successfully.


 
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