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RPS Newsletter October 2010
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This newsletter is a joint effort produced by ACPM's RPS, YPS and MSS sections, and will be produced quarterly. The intent of this newsletter is to provide a broader perspective, and reach a wider audience of ACPM members. We hope you enjoy this newsletter and encourage you to let us know what you think!

In This Issue:
Preventive Medicine, Health Disparities, and Dr. King's Dream
ACGME Issues Final Work Hour Rules for Residents
Inspiring Future Leaders of Preventive Medicine
Influenza Season Brings New Recommendations
MSS Collaborates with AMSA for National Primary Care Week
Upcoming Events
Preventive Medicine, Health Disparities, and Dr. King's Dream
by Sami Beg, YPS President

Dr. Martin Luther King once said, "Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane." It is hard to disagree with Dr. King's statement. Yet, as shocking and inhumane as these injustices are, we have still not been successful in eliminating them. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), disparities in the burden of death and illness experienced by minorities such as African-Americans, as compared with the U.S. population as a whole, continue. For example, in 2001 the age-adjusted death rate for cancer was 25.4 percent higher for African-Americans and the diabetes age-adjusted death rate for African-Americans was more than twice that for Caucasian Americans. African-Americans are also approximately 30% and 40% more likely to die of heart disease and stroke, respectively, than whites. Research has shown that all these diseases are preventable and when they do exist, can be better managed in this population.

One of the primary and obvious reasons these disparities remain is the healthcare system continues to be more about "care" and "cure" than about health. While universal healthcare can help meet some of the needs of the population, it is not a complete solution. Any system that focuses on reactive medicine, universal or not, is bound to fail from a public health perspective. Although the health reform bill makes prevention a priority, not until resources are made available to tackle the social dynamics of health will we accomplish the elimination of health disparities. When it comes to healthcare, we are often keen on finding complex bench science-based solutions, without realizing it is often the social and cultural crises in society that also need attention.

Work towards the elimination of racial and ethnic health disparities needs to continue on all fronts.In addition to creating competencies for lifestyle medicine, there is also a need to educate policy makers and the healthcare community to a greater extent on the social and public health dimensions of medicine. This includes the ability to recognize and appropriately focus on the social precursors of health. Unhealthy media messages must be challenged, and the medical home concept must be strengthened, to be truly successful in preventing diseases and health disparities.It is this proactive and preventive approach that can keep many from experiencing pain and suffering.

Despite recent successes, getting the country to focus on all aspects of prevention is filled with challenges. But as Dr. King reminded us decades ago, such health care work where we sincerely, not just superficially, address the most inhumane of injustices needs to continue.By helping keep Dr. King's dream alive - the dream of health equity and social justice for all - Preventive Medicine in its own unique way remains a great career option for those medical students and residents wanting to work toward the elimination of health disparities. By helping keep Dr. King's dream alive -- - the dream of health equity and social justice for all - Preventive Medicine in its own unique way remains a great career option for those medical students and residents wanting to work toward the elimination of health disparities. By helping keep Dr. King's dream alive -- - the dream of health equity and social justice for all - Preventive Medicine in its own unique way remains a great career option for those medical students and residents wanting to work toward the elimination of health disparities.

By helping keep Dr. King's dream alive -- - the dream of health equity and social justice for all - Preventive Medicine in its own unique way remains a great career option for those medical students and residents wanting to work toward the elimination of health disparities.

ACGME Issues Final Work Hour Rules for Residents
by Charlie Preston, RPS VP for Policy & Education

At the end of September, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) issued final rules for residency work hours. The rules adhere closely to the proposed rules released in June and will go into effect July 2011. The final rules require that interns not be allowed to work more than a 16 hour call.Upper year residents, however, can work up to 28 continuous hours.

Some groups, like the American Medical Students Association, expressed concern over the disparate treatment of interns and upper year residents, arguing that the rules would continue to expose residents to the safety risks of sleep deprivation. Other groups, like the American College of Surgeons, voiced concern that the restriction on intern work hours would harm education, patient safety, and continuity of care.

The one major change from the proposed rules to the final rules was a weakening of the requirement that residents work no more than a call every 3 days. The final rules allow for averaging of this requirement over 4 weeks.For a detailed summary, go to: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1010613.

Inspiring Future Leaders of Preventive Medicine
by Leonard Moore, MSS President

The Future Leaders of Preventive Medicine Travel Grant is a $500 travel grant awarded to 10 students which covers the majority of travel expenses and hotel accommodations to the ACPM Annual Meeting, which will be held this year in San Antonio, TX.

Last year, I and the current MSS Officers were afforded the opportunity to attend the conference for the first time through this travel grant. It was truly a mind-blowing experience as there were many great lectures, exhibits, and networking opportunities amongst students, resident, and practicing physicians. After returning to my home institution, I felt resurgence for my medical education because my eyes had been opened to the many new and exciting opportunities Preventive Medicine can provide.

If you are a medical student interested in prevention, public health, occupational medicine, aerospace medicine, or any other forms of prevention, I would strongly encourage you to apply. This year, the MSS Executive Board is excited to have been involved in the planning of sessions that will address student topics of interest, such as how the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will affect Preventive Medicine as well as the new changes to the Preventive Medicine residency curriculum.

All ACPM-MSS members will receive an email with further instructions on how to apply within the next few weeks. We hope to see you at the conference this year!

Influenza Season Brings New Recommendations
by Samuel Peik, RPS President

As the fall season brings new holidays to celebrate and a change in weather, flu season is also right around the corner. Accordingly, the CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has published new recommendations for use of influenza vaccine for the coming season.

The biggest change this year is now everyone 6 months and older should receive the flu vaccine.Prior recommendations previously excluded healthy non-pregnant adults age 18-45 (who also had no risk factors or contacts with risk factors). The broader recommendation is based on new evidence that the vaccine is safe and effective and has potential benefit to all age groups (especially with the appearance of H1N1). Not changed this year is the fact that children age 6 mos to 8 yrs who are receiving their first flu vaccine should receive two doses with a minimum interval of 4 weeks.

Groups at high risk for complications from influenza include children under 5 years, adults 65 or older, pregnant women, and people with certain medical conditions. Last season it was also noted that American Indians and Alaskan Natives were at higher risk of flu complications. Recommendations for antiviral use remains largely unchanged, and should mainly be used early in the treatment of those seriously ill or hospitalized with influenza.

The 2010-2011 seasonal flu vaccine is trivalent and will cover the following viruses: H1N1 (A/California/7/2009), H3N2 (A/Perth/16/2009), and an influenza B strain (B/Brisbane/60/2008).

H1N1 is not expected to reach pandemic levels this year partly because an estimated 60% of the population now has some immunity, and some media outlets have reported that it is no longer a threat. However, it remains important for clinicians to be aware that the virus will likely be active this season and millions of people remain susceptible to it.

All health care providers should be aware of the new influenza recommendations, as they can have a significant impact on the public's health. For more information visit the CDC Influenza Site: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/.

MSS Collaborates with AMSA for National Primary Care Week
by Cole Zanetti, MSS Vice-President

This year the ACPM Medical Student Section (ACPM-MSS) has teamed up with the American Medical Student Association (AMSA) to create a major push for exposure to the field of Preventive Medicine. This year's National Primary Care Week, occurring from November 1-5, will have a distinctive preventive focus and is entitled "The Renaissance of Primary Care and Preventive Medicine in America."

During the week, one full day will be dedicated to describing the Preventive Medicine specialty and how students can become involved while in medical school. We have also teamed up with AMSA's Community and Environmental Health Committee to create monthly webinars where ACPM representatives will talk about issues concerning Preventive Medicine throughout the year. The webinar project will be continuous throughout the years to come in order to give greater exposure to the field of Preventive Medicine in the medical student realm.

These collaborations demonstrate ACPM member sections' continuing support and pursuit of outreach with partner organizations.

For more information, please visit: http://www.amsa.org/AMSA/Homepage/Events/NPCW.aspx.

Upcoming Events
by M. Christine David, RPS Secretary/Treasurer


75th Anniversary MCH Federal/State Partnership Meeting

The 75th Anniversary Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Federal/State Partnership Meeting will be held Wednesday, October 20 at the Washington Hilton, Washington, DC to commemorate the 75th anniversary of Title V of the Social Security Act.The meeting is onOctober 20, 2010.Register at www.blsmeetings.net/mch75thanniversary.

Drexel to Host Global Health Day

The Drexel University School of Public Health will be hosting its Global Health Opportunities Day on Friday, October 22 at the New College Building, 245 N. 15th Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19102. The event will feature a global health opportunities fair and panel discussion featuring officials from CARE International, Global Health Fellows Program, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Global Health Initiative and more. The meeting is on October 22nd, 2010.Registration is required at www.publichealth.drexel.edu/global.

Fogarty International Clinical Research Scholars Program

The National Institute of Health's (NIH) Fogarty International Clinical Research Scholars Program offers U.S. medical and graduate students in the health sciences hands-on experience at top-ranked, NIH-funded research centers abroad.Applications are due Friday, November 19. Learn more at fogartyscholars.org.

Note: The answer to last month's clinical case will appear in next month's regularly scheduled RPS Newsletter.


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