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ACPM Headlines 12/23/14
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In this Issue

Top Stories

1. ACPM priorities fare well in FY15 spending bill

2. Rankings show U.S. setback in combating obesity and physical inactivity

3. Index grades 2014 national health security preparedness

ACPM News

4. ACPM signs letter calling for data on sales of antibiotics for use in animals

5. ACPM signs letter supporting funding for MIECHV home visitation programs

6. Register now for Preventive Medicine 2015 and win!

Policy and Practice

7. New rules to ban smoking in federal prisons

8. USPSTF seeking public comment on periodic gynecologic screenings

9. HHS releases draft strategic plan for health IT

Research and Reports

10. UK study shows models of collaboration between hospitals, PHDs, et al

11. CDC publishes report on sexual violence surveillance

12. Swimming shown to reduce falls in older men

Announcements

13. Healthy Eating Research seeking proposals for childhood obesity prevention efforts

14. Free AHRQ workshop and tools on shared decision making

15. CDC Injury Center recruiting Director, Division of Violence Prevention

16. PCORI and NIH seeking proposals to improve blood pressure in minorities

 

Top Stories

1. ACPM PRIORITIES FARE WELL IN FY15 SPENDING BILL

Despite continued efforts to reduce federal spending, Congress gave a nod to ACPM as it passed its end-of-year FY 2015 omnibus appropriations bill by providing an increase of $2.2 million to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to expand support for preventive medicine residency (PMR) training programs. The bill also allocated $11.3 million to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for continued administration of the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS). The $11.3 million is the same amount of funding provided to NVDRS in FY 2014, which more than tripled from prior years’ levels.

The increase in HRSA funding for PMR is expected to support up to 40 new residents. A HRSA funding opportunity announcement is expected in the early spring.

2. AMERICA’S HEALTH RANKINGS: OBESITY AND PHYSICAL INACTIVITY UP AGAIN

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has released final rules for calorie labeling on restaurant menus and vending machines. Chain restaurants, including fast food "drive-thrus,” bakeries, coffee shops, movie theatres, made-to-order foods at grocery stores, and establishments serving certain alcoholic beverages will have to list overall calorie and other nutrition information for standard menu items on their menus and menu boards. Restaurants will be given one year to comply with this ruling. Vending machine operators with 20 or more machines will also be required to post calorie information near each product or its selection button. These operators will have two years to comply with this ruling. After encouraging improvement last year, America’s Health Rankings found in its 2014 report that obesity and physical inactivity has returned to the steady increase that's marked the rankings in the 25 years since it was first released. Obesity increased 7 percent—29.4 percent of adults are now obese—while physical inactivity increased 3 percent, which means 23.5 percent of U.S. adults did not participate in any physical activity outside of their job in the last 30 days.

Sponsored by the United Health Foundation, American Public Health Association, and Partnership for Prevention, the report found as a whole Americans continued to make progress on several health metrics in 2014, but unfortunately, serious challenges persist. Nearly 10% of adults now say they have diabetes, which is more than double the number from 20 years ago when the rankings started tracking the disease. "What people are not focusing enough on is that we are producing an extraordinary number of people who are unnecessarily sick," says ACPM Fellow Reed Tuckson, who is senior medical adviser to United Health Foundation. "They are pouring into medical system; it's a total crisis."

The good news? Smoking again declined this year, this time by 3 percent, immunization coverage for adolescents increased by 5 percent, and infant mortality rates dropped 4% compared with last year's report.

The report is the longest-running state-by-state analysis of the nation's health. A special section of this year’s report is devoted to 25-year reflections, which can be viewed here.

 

3. HOW PREPARED ARE WE? THE NATIONAL HEALTH SECURITY PREPAREDNESS INDEX SAYS…

The Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO), in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and more than 35 development partners, has released the 2014 National Health Security Preparedness Index™ (NHSPI™), which measures and advances the nation’s readiness to protect people during a health emergency or disaster. The 2014 index grades the U.S. 7.4 on a scale of 10, suggesting that substantial health security preparedness capability exists across the nation, but also that significant work still needs to be done.

As with 2013 findings, 2014 areas of relative strength include Countermeasure Management, Incident & Information Management, and Health Security Surveillance. Areas in need for greater development include the new domain of Environmental & Occupational Health, and Healthcare Delivery (previously Surge Management) and Community Planning & Engagement.

 

ACPM News

4. ACPM SIGNS LETTER CALLING FOR DATA ON SALES OF ANTIBIOTICS FOR USE IN ANIMALS

ACPM joined several partner organizations in public health and medicine on a letter to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) administrator Margaret Hamburg, MD, calling on FDA to “move quickly to 1) release already-collected data on the sales of antibiotics for use in food-producing animals from 2013; 2) make public the FDA’s plans for collecting data on how antibiotics are used on farms; and 3) identify any gaps or barriers to collecting these data.”

The letter notes that “Public health agencies and experts, including advisors to the White House, recognize that to better address the catastrophic threat from antibiotic resistance, the U.S. needs to do a better job of collecting and rapidly disseminating data, monitoring and surveillance of resistance, as well as reporting antimicrobial sales and usage data.”


5. ACPM SIGNS LETTER SUPPORTING FUNDING FOR HOME VISITATION PROGRAMS

ACPM partnered with over 750 leading national, state, tribal, and local organizations urging Congress to extend funding to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visitation (MIECHV) program. States receiving this funding are able to provide evidence-based home visiting services for their children and families.

A copy of this letter was sent to majority and minority leaders in both the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives. As a result, Congress ultimately appropriated $154 million to HRSA programs that focus on ‘Maternal and Child Health’ in addition to several other areas, such as ‘Primary Health Care’ and ‘Health Workforce’ in the FY2015 omnibus appropriations package passed by Congress this month.

 

6. MANY REASONS TO GIVE THIS HOLIDAY SEASON

ACPM Fellow Robert Orford, a recent Your Gift Matters donor, reflects on the importance of donating to charity, and specifically to ACPM: “An important obligation of professionalism is lifelong education, and another is to support others who are progressing through the earlier stages of their careers. Donating to ACPM satisfies part of both professional obligations.”

Need another reason to give? As the year comes to a close, so does the opportunity for making a tax-deductible donation for 2014. Consider joining your fellow ACPM members in contributing to the Your Gift Matters Campaign; make a gift today.

Visit www.ACPM.org/Donations and donate online before midnight December 31, 2014.


Policy and Practice

7. NEW RULES TO BAN SMOKING IN FEDERAL PRISONS

According to a report in The Hill, the federal Bureau of Prisons will soon release new rules that will prohibit smoking in the nation’s federal prisons. According to the Bureau, the rule targets more than 212,000 inmates who will be disciplined if they are caught with cigarettes, cigars, pipes, or any other tobacco products. To assist inmates in quitting, the Bureau offers tobacco cessation programs at all of its facilities.


8. FROM THE USPSTF: SCREENING FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE AND PERIODIC GYNECOLOGIC SCREENINGS

  • The U.S. Preventive Service Task Force has posted a draft recommendation statement recommending screening for high blood pressure in adults age 18 years and older (A grade). Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is recommended to confirm high blood pressure before the diagnosis of hypertension, except in cases for which immediate initiation of therapy is necessary. In addition, the evidence summary for this topic was published in the online edition of Annals of Internal Medicine and is available on the Task Force Web site. Public comment will be accepted on this draft recommendation statement until January 26th, 2015, at 8:00 pm EST.

  • The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has issued a draft research plan to review the benefits and harms of routine, periodic pelvic examinations. Gynecological Conditions: Screening With the Pelvic Examination will answer key questions examining the effectiveness of screening, accuracy of the pelvic exam in screening for gynecologic conditions, and the adverse effects of screening for these conditions. Public comment will be accepted on this draft research plan until January 7th, 2015, at 7:00 pm EST.


9
. HHS RELEASES DRAFT STRATEGIC PLAN FOR HEALTH IT

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has released its draft strategic plan for health information technology. The plan aims to: expand adoption of health IT, advance interoperable health information, strengthen health care delivery, advance health and wellbeing of individuals and communities, and advance research, scientific knowledge and innovation. The plan was prepared by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology.


Research and Reports

10. STUDY EXAMINES SUCCESSFUL PARTNERSHIPS TO IMPROVE COMMUNITY HEALTH

A multi-disciplinary team based at the University of Kentucky College of Public Health, including ACPM past president Douglas Scutchfield, has completed a national study of successful partnerships between hospitals, public health departments, and other stakeholders focused on assessing and improving the health of communities they jointly serve. The study sought to identify highly-successful partnerships, examine those relationships, and ascertain key lessons learned from their collective experiences.

Among nine emerging patterns identified in the study:

  • The active engagement of many partners in the establishment and on-going operations of collaborative partnerships is essential to their sustainability and success.
  • Many partnerships continue to be challenged in developing objectives and metrics and demonstrating their linkages with the overall measure(s) of population health on which they have chosen to focus.
  • Partnership leadership style tends to evolve toward servant leadership.
  • Financial sustainability remains a significant issue for many partnerships.

11. CDC REPORT STANDARIZES SEXUAL VIOLENCE SURVEILLANCE TERMS AND DEFINITIONS

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has updated a report standardizing sexual violence surveillance terms and data elements. Sexual Violence Surveillance: Uniform Definitions and Recommended Data Elements contains definitions for terms such as sexual violence, intimate partner, terms associated with the consequence of violence, and an extensive list of data elements that can be used in sexual violence surveillance. This information is intended for researchers and public health practitioners to collect better quality data for dissemination to policy makers, victim advocates, service providers, and others who can address this significant public health problem.


12. SWIMMING ASSOCIATED WITH LESS FALLS IN OLDER MEN

Among several physical activities tested, swimming was the only activity associated with a protective effect against falls in older men, according to a four-year Australian study of self-reported fall incidence. Swimming outperformed various sporting activities in the study (golf, calisthenics, lawn bowl, and stationary aerobic exercise). Swimmers also performed better on a postural sway test indicating a potential protective mechanism through superior balance when compared to other study participants. The study, published in the Journal of Epidemiology, can be accessed through the following link: http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/180/8/830.abstract.


Announcements

13. HEALTHY EATING RESEARCH SEEKING PROPOSALS FOR CHILDHOOD OBESITY PREVENTION EFFORTS

Healthy Eating Research, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), has issued a call for proposals focusing on childhood obesity prevention efforts in retail stores and early care and education facilities. Awards up to $75,000 are available for this 12-month project. Concept papers will be accepted until January 7th.

14. AHRQ OFFERS FREE WORKSHOP AND TOOLS ON SHARED DECISION MAKING

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) is offering new tools for health care providers focused on translating patient-centered outcomes research findings on shared decision-making. In addition to online resources, AHRQ is also offering a free train-the-trainer workshop on the SHARE Approach:

  • Seek your patient’s participation
  • Help your patient explore and compare treatment options
  • Assess your patient’s values and preferences
  • Reach a decision with your patient
  • Evaluate your patient’s decision

The next workshop will occur in St. Louis in January 2015. Providers are encouraged to contact AHRQ if interested in having a workshop in their area.

15. CDC INJURY CENTER RECRUITING DIRECTOR, DIVISION OF VIOLENCE PREVENTION

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Center for Injury Prevention and Control is hiring a Director for the Division of Violence Prevention. The successful applicant will serve as principal advisor to the Injury Center on division activities and develop and implement national, state, or local policies, programs and research studies regarding this significant public health issue. Applicants are expected to have demonstrated experience in one or more public health disciplines and a personal record of significant contributions to the field. Applications are open until January 5th.

16. PCORI AND NIH SEEKING PROPOSALS TO IMPROVE BLOOD PRESSURE IN MINORITIES

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes for Health (NIH) have released a proposal for new patient-centered comparative effectiveness clinical trials on blood pressure. The “Testing Multi-Level Interventions to Improve Blood Pressure Control in Minority Racial/Ethnic, Low Socioeconomic Status, and/or Rural Populations” RFA is designed to compare alternative, evidence-based approaches to reduce hypertension among these high-risk population groups. PCORI and NHLBI expect to fund up to two new projects a total of $23 million over a five-year project period. Proposals will be accepted until February 13th.

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