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ACPM Headlines 11/28/12
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In this Issue

Top Stories

1. AMA adopts ACPM policy to protect Prevention and Public Health Fund


2. USPSTF issues draft universal HIV screening recommendation

3. AJPM launches new iPad app


ACPM News

4. Time to renew your ACPM membership

5. Tis’ the season for giving … to your College!

6. Get involved—join an ACPM Section or Committee

7. Call for Prevention Practice Committee nominees

8. ACPM welcomes new Fellows


Policy and Practice

9. HHS accepting comments on mid-course update of Physical Activity Guidelines

10. EMR use improves among PC docs, but access to care still a problem

Research and Reports

11. CDC report: diabetes rates soaring

12. Researchers discover gene mutation related to circadian clock

13. WHO booklet on endocrine disruptors and child health

Announcements

14. CDC/CSTE seeking applicants for Public Health Informatics Fellowship

15. HHS launches BeTobaccoFree.gov

16. Help protect infants from flu infection

 

Top Stories

1. AMA ADOPTS ACPM POLICY TO PROTECT PREVENTION AND PUBLIC HEALTH FUND

ACPM, along with the support of 15 national medical specialty societies,introduced and successfully championed a policy resolution at the recent American Medical Association (AMA) interim House of Delegates meeting calling on the AMA to protect the Prevention and Public Health Fund. The resolution specifically called on the AMA "to support budget allocations from the Prevention and Public Health Fund at no less than the levels adopted in the Affordable Care Act” and "actively oppose policies that aim to cut, divert, or use as an offset, dollars from the Prevention and Public Health Fund for purposes other than those stipulated in the Affordable Care Act.” The ACPM resolution firmly places the house of medicine infull support of the continued viability of the Prevention and Public Health Fund and restricts the AMA from supporting measures that siphon dollars from the fund.

Earlier this year, the Prevention and Public Health Fund was reduced by roughly $6 billion from its original $15 billion, ten-year authorization to increase payment for disease treatment services under Medicare, and some in Congress continue to call for elimination of the Fund to help pay for programs that fall outside the scope of prevention and public health.

ACPM would like to recognize AMA delegate and Treasurer Robert Gilchick, MD, MPH, FACPM for his diligent work in ushering the ACPM resolution through the HoD process and thank the following national specialty societies for their strong support: Aerospace Medical Association, American Academy of Family Physicians, American Academy of Insurance Medicine, American Academy of Pediatrics, American Association of Public Health Physicians, American College of Cardiology, American College of Medical Quality, American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, American Medical Student Association, American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, American Society of Addiction Medicine, American Society of Bariatric Physicians,American Thoracic Society, Infectious Disease Society of America, and The Endocrine Society.

2. USPSTF DRAFT RECOMMENDATION CALLS FOR UNIVERSAL HIV SCREENING

The United States Preventive Services Task Force has issued a draft recommendation that all adults (aged 15-65) should be screened for HIV. It also reaffirmed its recommendation for screening all pregnant women, giving both a "Grade A.” The previous recommendation for all non-pregnant adults had been a "Grade C.” The task force also recommends that high-risk teens younger than 15 years old and high-risk adults older than 65 should be screened.

The change comes from new research showing that lower transmission rates and less AIDS-related complications result from starting antiretroviral treatment earlier in the disease course. Data showed that screening based on risk-factor assessment could miss up to 20-25% of those infected. In addition, short- and long-term harms from screening the whole population were minimal. Concurrently, the false-positive rate of the diagnostic test is low, short-term side effects from antiretroviral treatment (ART) are usually minimal, and transient and long-term effects of ART, including cardiovascular disease, seem to be small.

The final recommendation will be issued after a period for public comment, which ends on December 17th.

Visit the USPSTF web site for the full recommendation statement and to submit a comment.


3. AJPM LAUNCHES NEW IPAD APP

Do you enjoy the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, but your travel schedule and other commitments make it difficult to stay current with the latest articles on prevention research, teaching, practice and policy? AJPM has gone mobile with the announcement of its new AJPM iPad application. The app is now live in iTunes and can be accessed at http://ow.ly/fAOJO.

The AJPM iPad app brings you the convenience of reading your favorite journal from anywhere in the world with just a tap.

  • Browse each new monthly issue
  • Sign up for automatic notifications of new content
  • Read abstracts and articles in full screen reading mode
  • Swipe between articles for easy browsing of the latest issue
  • Play in-article videos
  • Save articles on your device so you can read offline
  • Bookmark key articles and take notes for follow-up later
  • Email useful images or articles
  • Post useful articles on your Facebook or Twitter account for colleague awareness
  • Search locally stored content

More information about the app and instructions on how to access full-text articles in the app is available on the AJPM web site. The app is free to download, but accessing full-text articles requires members to enter their www.ajpmonline.org Username and Password.


ACPM News

4. KEEP YOUR ACPM MEMBERSHIP CURRENT

It’s that time again! ACPM’s annual membership dues renewal season is well underway. First and second notices reminding members of the upcoming December 31 expiration date have been mailed. We encourage you to submit your membership dues renewal as soon as possible to ensure continuation of valuable ACPM member benefits, including reduced rates on annual meeting registration, CME/MOC credit discounts (members pay no fees—while non-members pay $10 per credit!), publications, and much more.

To renew your membership, simply visit our website and login with your username and password, select the option to "Manage Profile” and "Click to Renew Your Membership Dues.” Our quick and convenient online renewal process also offers the option to obtain a receipt for your transaction.

Don’t wait—renew your membership today and stay connected with ACPM! Also, be sure to take a few moments and update your member profile with current contact information, which will help assure you derive the most value from your dues dollars.

Have questions about your renewal? Visit http://www.acpm.org/?page=MemberRenewal for additional information and/or assistance or contact Camille Sanders at csanders@acpm.org.


5. SUPPORT THE COLLEGE WITH YOUR GIVING

‘Tis the season for giving, and we encourage you to support ACPM with a tax-deductible gift this year. Your generous gift will help extend ACPM’s outreach to aspiring preventive medicine physicians, and cultivate young leaders within the College. No amount is too large or small! All gifts are warmly welcomed and appreciated. Donors who contribute $500 or more in a year are granted membership in the Preventive Medicine Leadership Society.

Giving to ACPM is quick and easy. Simply visit www.acpm.org/donations to make a gift using our secure server. Or, if you prefer, gifts may also be mailed to American College of Preventive Medicine, c/o Development Office, 455 Massachusetts Ave. N.W., Washington, DC 20001. Your contribution to ACPM is 100% tax deductible under the full extent of the law. ACPM’s Federal Tax Identification Number is 23-1722119.

Please contact ACPM’s Chief Development Officer, Maureen Simmons, MA, CFRE, at msimmons@acpm.org for more information.


6. GET INVOLVED—JOIN AN ACPM SECTION OR COMMITTEE!

Reap a great return on your membership investment by becoming more involved in your professional society! ACPM offers a wealth of volunteer membership sections, committees, and interest groups that allow members to network, explore professional interests, and contribute to the preventive medicine community in a variety of ways.

To learn more about ACPM’s groups:

  • Visit the ACPM website and review section/committee web pages.
  • Select the group that best suits your area of interest and join online.
  • Contact the section or committee leaders (their names are on the committee web pages as hyperlinks). Section/Committee leaders are always looking for members who want to become involved in activities such as program planning, e-newsletter writing, advertising, recruiting, etc. Let them know that you would like to work on upcoming projects.
  • Stay connected through section/committee/interest group conference calls, meetings, and web-based discussions.

For additional information about member groups (sections/committees/interest groups), please visit our website or contact the ACPM Membership Office!


7
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ACPM PREVENTION PRACTICE COMMITTEE SEEKS NEW MEMBERS

The ACPM Prevention Practice Committee is seeking new members to help advance its priority objectives under the ACPM Strategic Plan. The committee is charged with activities that:

  1. Promote, advance and optimize the delivery of evidence-based clinical preventive services, including competencies in lifestyle medicine.
  2. Promote prevention-focused and systems-based delivery innovations that improve the effectiveness and efficiency of health care.
  3. Promote Preventive Medicine and Preventive Medicine physicians as experts in systems-, population-based, and clinical preventive medicine.

Examples of these activities include publishing ACPM position statements on preventive and lifestyle medicine; publishing consumer-focused summaries of ACPM positions in mainstream print and online publications; and building working relationships with health professionals and systems to promote preventive medicine expertise. This is a fantastic opportunity for members who are interested in greater involvement with ACPM and obtaining fellowship with the College.

If you would like more information on the committee’s strategic plan priorities, please contact Andrea Lowe, Policy and Practice Manager, at alowe@acpm.org. To apply please submit a short statement of interest and qualifications along with your curriculum vitae (CV) to Ms. Lowe.


8. ACPM WELCOMES NEW FELLOWS

ACPM’s Membership Committee has approved the following Members for Fellowship in the American College of Preventive Medicine (FACPM) (in alphabetical order, by last name): Andrea Feller, MD, FACPM, Boris Pavlin, MD, MPH, FACPM, David Blaney, MD, MPH, FACPM, Frank Welch, MD, MSPH, FACPM, Paul Jung, MD, MPH, MBA, MA, FACPM, Richard Safeer, MD, FACPM.ACPM extends congratulations to all of its new Fellows! New Fellows will be formally recognized at the Preventive Medicine 2013 banquet in Phoenix-Scottsdale, AZ, on February 23, 2013. Submission dates for 2013 Fellowship applications will be announced soon.

 

Policy and Practice

9. HHS ACCEPTING COMMENTS ON MID-COURSE UPDATE OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY GUIDELINES

The federal Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) is seeking public comment on the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Mid-course Report: Strategies for Increasing Physical Activity Among Youth until 9 AM EST Monday, December 10th.

ODPHP, working with the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports, & Nutrition convened a subcommittee to review evidence-based strategies to increase physical activity in children and youth. These strategies form the basis of the mid-course report and are organized into five settings: Family and Home, Preschool and Childcare, School, Primary Care, and Community. The final report is expected to be released in 2013. Comments may be submitted via email or postal mail. Please see the link above for more information.

 

10. EMR USE IMPROVES AMONG PRIMARY CARE DOCS, BUT ACCESS TO CARE STILL A PROBLEM

U.S. physicians are increasingly adopting electronic medical records (EMRs), according to the Commonwealth Fund-sponsored 2012 International Survey of Primary Care Doctors, a 10-country survey of primary care physicians reporting progress in the use of Health Information Technology (HIT). Among U.S. physicians, the EMR adoption rate increased from 46% in 2009 to 69% in 2012. A similar increase was identified among Canadian physicians, yet both countries use HIT less often than U.K., New Zealand, or Australian physicians.

U.S. physicians also noted that treatment affordability and insurance restrictions can complicate care. Fifty-nine percent of U.S. primary care physicians reported that their patients cannot afford care regularly compared to less than 25% in other developed nations.

Among all countries surveyed, care coordination and communication between specialists and primary care providers remains problematic.

 

Research and Reports

11.CDC: DIABETES RATES SOARING

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that by 2010 diabetes prevalence in every state, DC, and Puerto Rico was above 6%, whereas in 1995 all states except for Louisiana, Mississippi, California, the District of Columbia (DC), and Puerto Rico had diabetes prevalence below 6% of the population. In six states, as well as Puerto Rico, the prevalence was above 10%. The data were released by CDC in the summary, "Increasing Prevalence of Diagnosed Diabetes—United States and Puerto Rico, 1995-2010.”

In this article, researchers analyzed Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data on adults with diabetes collected from 1995-2010. Researchers also analyzed the data by U.S. geographic region and found median diabetes prevalence to be highest in the South (9.8%) compared to all other regions in 2010. This region also experienced the largest relative increase in prevalence, followed by the Western region. For additional statistics and figures, please visit the link above.

 

12. SCIENTISTS DISCOVER GENE MUTATION RELATED TO CIRCADIAN CLOCK

For the first time, new research has identified a common gene variant that affects the "circadian clock,” or the natural daily rhythm of the body’s processes, for virtually the entire population. This circadian clock regulates when a person is most alert, when blood pressure is highest, and when the heart is most efficient, usually up to an hour a day.

Several rare gene mutations have been found that can adjust this clock in humans, responsible for one’s tendency to be an early riser or night owl—or for entire families in which people wake up at 3 am or 4 am, and are unable to stay up beyond 8pm in the evening. In addition to providing some assistance in understanding the rhythm of people’s day-to-day lives, it is believed that this genetic variant may indicate the time of day a person is most likely to die, as it influences the timing of acute medical events like stroke and heart attack. The surprising findings, which appear in the November 2012 issue of the Annals of Neurology, could help with scheduling shift work and planning medical treatments, as well as in monitoring the conditions of vulnerable patients.

To learn more, read the complete article online.

 

13.WHO PUBLISHES BOOKLET ON ENDOCRINE DISRUPTERS AND CHILD HEALTH

The World Health Organization has published a new booklet, "Endocrine disrupters and child health: Possible developmental early effects of endocrine disrupters on child health.” The publication is a short summary of the current knowledge of the effects of endocrine disrupters on child health. It focuses on the congenital disorders, cryptorchidism and hypospadias, which have a clear endocrine connection, on thyroid hormone-related problems, and on puberty.

As there is limited knowledge of the association of human disorders with exposure to endocrine disrupters, the booklet concludes that international and national efforts are needed to pursue multiple unresolved research questions. This will necessitate intensive interdisciplinary and translational research targeting the developmental processes with all means available from chemistry and genetics to epidemiology and modern systems biology.


Announcements

14. CDC/CSTE SEEKING APPLICANTS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH INFORMATICS FELLOWSHIP

Applications are open for health professionals interested in pursuing an Applied Public Health Informatics Fellowship at a state or local health agency. This fellowship opportunity is available through a partnership of the CDC, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Association of Schools of Public Health, and the Public Health Informatics Institute.

Successful applicants will receive one year of high-quality informatics experience and assistance with long-term placement at state or local health agencies. Qualifications include a doctoral or master’s degree in public health informatics, epidemiology, statistics, computer/information science, public health, medicine, nursing, or health care as well as completed coursework in public health informatics. Applications will be accepted until February 15, 2013.

 
15. HHS LAUNCHES TOBACCO PREVENTION AND CESSATION WEB SITE

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has launched a new web site detailing smoking cessation and prevention information. This web site, BeTobaccoFree.gov, utilizes social media, videos, posters, and factsheets to educate the public on the negative health effects of smoking or tobacco use. Specific sections focus on children as well as non-smoking and smoking youth and adults.

This web site is designed to interface with smartphones, tablets, and desktops. It will also be continuously updated with state and federal tobacco-related news, policies, and research as it becomes available; serving as a comprehensive resource for tobacco information.


16. RESOURCE PROMOTES "COCOONING” TO HELP PROTECT INFANTS FROM FLU INFECTION

Preventive medicine and primary care clinicians are encouraged to talk to their patients about "cocooning” as an illness prevention method for infants. Cocooning is a protective measure taken to encourage all adults and children to be up to date with their immunizations. This may help infants by limiting their exposure to vaccine-preventable diseases such as influenza, creating a "cocoon” around the infant. For more information, please read the article "Cocooning: influenza vaccine for parents and caregivers in an urban, pediatric medical home”. Or, download a printable patient handout here.


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