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ACPM Headlines 11/11/13
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On this Veterans Day, ACPM salutes all the men and women in the uniformed services for their dedication and service to this nation. 


In this Issue 

Top Stories

1. ACPM leaders meet with HRSA administrator

2. USPSTF releases annual report and draft recommendation statement

3. Community Guide releases recommendations to reduce CVD

ACPM News

4. "Your Gift Matters” – seeking members’ support for critical ACPM work

5. Help ACPM identify and recognize the leaders in our field: Submit a nomination

6. NPR affiliate addresses preventive medicine perspective on ‘sitting’

Policy and Practice

7. FDA announces drug shortage proposed rule and strategic plan

8. CDC issues guidance on managing food allergies in schools

9. Online program helps cancer patients assess infection risk during treatment

10. AHRQ releases Atlas of Integrated Behavioral Health Care Quality Measures

Research and Reports

11. CDC data show no changes in prevalence of obesity or hypertension

12. Quick screenings can reduce colorectal cancer mortality

13. Study finds 1 in 10 older teens misuse Rx painkillers and sedatives

Announcements

14. FDA requesting nominations for Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee

15. Call for applications for National Leadership Academy for the Public’s Health

16. Univ of Kentucky team seeks models of community/clinical collaboration

17. NIH seeks input on Office of Disease Prevention Draft Strategic Plan


Top Stories

1. ACPM LEADERS MEET WITH HRSA ADMINISTRATOR

ACPM leaders took the College’s primary advocacy issue to high levels of the executive branch last week by meeting with the administrator of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Dr. Mary Wakefield. Specifically, ACPM leaders urged for increased funding for preventive medicine residency (PMR) training programs in President Obama's FY 2015 budget proposal, as Federal agencies currently are working to craft their budget requests for FY 2015.

ACPM president-elect and past chair of the department of community health and preventive medicine at Morehouse School of Medicine Dan Blumenthal, MD, MPH, FACPM, Graduate Medical Education Committee chair and University of California San Diego program director Linda Hill, MD, MPH, FACPM, Council of Preventive Medicine Residency Program Directors chair and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill program director Deborah Porterfield, MD, MPH, FACPM, SUNY Stonybrook resident Charles diPierro, MD, and University of New Mexico resident Kevin Vlahovich, MD, discussed the unique role preventive medicine physicians play in improving the health of populations and advancing efforts to integrate primary care and public health, a new focus area for HRSA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Also, the ACPM team presented data on work settings of PM graduates and occupational duties of preventive medicine physicians.

HRSA has long provided limited support to PMR training programs through its Health Professions training grants, and while 8 programs currently benefit from HRSA support, nearly 40 programs applied for funding in the most recent round of funding applications. ACPM executive director Mike Barry and associate executive director for policy, advocacy and external affairs Paul Bonta joined the ACPM team. Dr. Wakefield was joined by Dr. Sarah Linde-Feucht, HRSA's chief public health officer, and Rebecca Sptizgo, acting administrator of the Bureau of Health Professions.


2. USPSTF RELEASES ANNUAL REPORT AND PRODUCTS ON OLDER ADULTS AND TOBACCO CESSATION

The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has released three new products of interest to the prevention community.

All USPSTF products can be found at the USPSTF website.

3. LATEST RELEASE FROM THE COMMUNITY GUIDE: CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE PREVENTION

The Community Preventive Services Task Force has announced its latest recommendation on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention: Clinical Decision-Support Systems. The Task Force recommends clinical decision-support systems (CDSS) for prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) based on sufficient evidence of effectiveness in improving screening for CVD risk factors and practices for CVD-related preventive care services, clinical tests, and treatments.CDSS are computer-based information systems designed to assist healthcare providers in implementing clinical guidelines at the point of care.


ACPM NEWS

4. YOUR GIFT MATTERS!

Last month, ACPM launched its first major gift fundraising campaign, "Prevention Matters. ACPM Matters. Your Gift Matters.” The campaign encourages members to demonstrate their commitment to preventive medicine and ACPM with a financial contribution. Funds raised will support ACPM educational programs and training, expanded professional development and networking opportunities, critical advocacy activities, and other initiatives in support of ACPM’s strategic plan. In addition, funds raised will help strengthen ACPM’s financial position for long-term success.

With the array of public health challenges facing our society, ranging from diabetes and obesity to food safety and environmental health issues, and as we look to implement sweeping health reform, the role of preventive medicine, and the role of ACPM, has never been more important. Support ACPM and help us continue to lead the way in preventive medicine. Learn more about the campaign, and donate online today.


5. ACPM SEEKING NOMINATIONS FOR LEADERSHIP POSITIONS AND RECOGNITION AWARDS

Board of Regents

ACPM is pleased to announce the Call for Nominations to fill upcoming vacancies on the ACPM Board of Regents. Elections will be held in early-2014 for Secretary, Treasurer, Occupational Medicine Regent, and regents for the Northeast and Midwest regions.

To submit a nomination, or if you would like to be considered for any of the vacancies listed above, please submit a nomination letter, with the proposed candidate’s curriculum vitae (CV) through ACPM’s website. Both a nomination letter and CV are required for consideration. All candidates must be active ACPM Fellows. If nominated for a Regional Regent position, candidates must reside in the region they wish to represent.

Election winners will be announced during the ACPM annual meeting, Preventive Medicine 2014. Please take a moment and consider whether you or someone you know would be a good choice for a leadership position with ACPM. Also, before submitting a nomination, please check with the member to ensure they are an active ACPM Fellow, meet regional residency requirements (if applicable), and would be willing to accept the nomination. Nominations for Board of Regents positions are due Friday, November 22, 2013.

Awards

Annually, ACPM recognizes individuals for significant contributions, dedication and service to the College and preventive medicine. ACPM currently is accepting nominations for the following awards: Ron Davis Distinguished Service, Special Recognition, William Kane Rising Star, and Donald Gemson Resident Award. Nominations for Awards are due Friday, November 22, 2013. Award recipients will be recognized during the ACPM Annual Meeting, Preventive Medicine 2014. Please consider nominating a deserving colleague for one of these awards!


6. NPR AFFILIATE EXAMINES PREVENTIVE MEDICINE PERSPECTIVE ON HAZARDS OF SITTING

Boston’s NPR affiliate WBUR recently published online a story on its blog, CommonHealth, featuring ACPM Fellow and preventive medicine spokesperson David Katz, MD, MPH, FACP, FACPM discussing the relative risks of sitting versus smoking. Titled, "’Sitting Is The New Smoking?’ Well, No, But Got Your Attention,” the story by CommonHealth Blog author Carey Goldberg addresses the recent spate of pronouncements (or memes in today’s cultural parlance describing new viral phrases or other movements of society) about the hazards of sitting, claiming that ‘sitting is the new smoking.’

Dr. Katz notes that for any message to break through in our popular culture, it’s got to be hyperbolic. While he notes that smoking is clearly worse for one’s health, he points out: "I think what the message is meant to imply rather than what it states explicitly is that thisisa threat to health, being too sedentary, spending too much time on our backsides.”

The on-air version of Ms. Goldberg’s interview with Dr. Katz is available here.


Policy and Practice

7. FDA ANNOUNCES DRUG SHORTAGE PROPOSED RULE AND STRATEGIC PLAN

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has rolled out a strategic plan and a proposed rule meant to avert drug shortages and lessen the effects of shortages when they do occur.

The 40-page strategic plan outlines steps FDA intends to take to improve its ability to minimize the effects of shortages and address their root causes. Specific actions in the strategic plan include improving internal communications and data collection and management activities at FDA and doing a better job of sharing information about shortages with groups outside the agency.

To address the root causes of shortages, the agency wants to better identify early signs of impending shortages. Also, FDA wants to find incentives for drug makers to adopt and sustain high-quality manufacturing processes that lessen the likelihood of shortages related to production problems.


8. CDC ISSUES GUIDANCE ON MANAGING FOOD ALLERGIES IN SCHOOLS

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in response to Section 112 of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (2011), has developed Voluntary Guidelines for Managing Food Allergies in Schools and Early Care and Education Programs. These guidelines are designed to help schools prevent allergic reactions in children with known food allergies as well as respond effectively to the emergency needs of children who are not known to have food allergies. Studies have found that 25% of severe and potentially life-threatening reactions reported at school occur among children with no medical history of food allergies.

The Voluntary Guidelines and FAQs address food allergy management planning and practice for all members involved with the educational system, including school board members, school administrators, classroom teachers, and bus drivers.


9. ONLINE PROGRAM HELPS CANCER PATIENTS ASSESS INFECTION RISK DURING TREATMENT

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has launched an enhanced website www.preventcancerinfections.org to help cancer patients manage and prevent infections while undergoing chemotherapy.

The website was created through a partnership between the CDC and the CDC Foundation. It is an evidence-based, interactive online program designed to educate patients about the effects of chemotherapy on the immune system, and to empower them to take a proactive role in maintaining their health throughout cancer treatment.

10. AHRQ ANNOUNCES ATLAS OF INTEGRATED BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CARE QUALITY MEASURES

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) has released the 2013 Atlas of Integrated Behavioral Health Care Quality Measures to help primary care organizations and researchers identify and assess quality measures for integrating behavioral health care. Developed by AHRQ’s Academy for Integrating Behavioral Health and Primary Care, the atlas features nine core measures that describe specific characteristics, actions and selected outcomes of integrated care. All measures were chosen based on criteria established by a panel of experts. New measures will be added as they become available.

Integrated primary and behavioral health care is an emerging field with the potential to improve patient care experiences, achieve better clinical outcomes, and lower health care costs.


Research and Reports

11. CDC DATA SHOW NO CHANGE IN PREVALENCE OF OBESITY AND HYPERTENSION

The prevalence of both obesity and hypertension in American adults remains unchanged over the past two years, according to 2011–2012 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The 2011–2012 data show that over one-third (35%) of adults in the U.S. were obese, the same rate as in 2009-2010. Likewise, 29.1% of American adults were hypertensive in 2011-2012, compared to a similar 28.6% in 2009-2010. Minority groups, particularly non-Hispanic black individuals, had the highest overall rates of both hypertension and obesity.


12. QUICK SCREENINGS CAN REDUCE COLORECTAL CANCER MORTALITY

Fecal occult blood test (FOBT) screening can provide long-lasting protection against colon cancer, according to a recent University of Minnesota study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Using data from the landmark Minnesota Colon Cancer Control Study launched in the 1970’s, researchers compared a control group to two intervention groups: one which was screened yearly with FOBT, and another screened every other year with FOBT. Patients with positive results were referred for colonoscopy.

Researchers found that study participants who received either type of FOBT screening had comparable reductions in colorectal cancer death up to 30 years later. The study was the first to show that fecal-occult colon cancer screening—testing feces for the presence of blood—could be effective in reducing deaths.


13. STUDY FINDS 1 IN 10 OLDER TEENS MISUSE PRESCRIPTION PAINKILLERS AND SEDATIVES

Nearly 1 in 10 youth aged 14 to 20 years have reported nonmedical prescription opioid use (NPOU) or nonmedical prescription sedative use (NPSU) in the past year, according to researchers from the University of Washington and University of Michigan. Reporting in the journal, Pediatrics, "Nonmedical Prescription Opioid and Sedative Use Among Adolescents in the Emergency Department” details the results of a self-reported survey of 2,135 youth who visited the University of Michigan Medical Center Emergency Department between September 2010 and September 2011.

This study also linked NPOU/NPSU with additional risky behaviors, such as drinking and driving and dating violence. As a result of their findings, the researchers recommend emergency departments create screening and intervention protocols to identify and prevent NPOU/NPSU among adolescents.


Announcements

14. FDA SEEKING NOMINATIONS FOR TOBACCO PRODUCTS SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requesting nominations for membership on the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. This committee reviews and evaluates evidence regarding safety and public health issues related to tobacco products and provides advice, information, and recommendations to the FDA Commissioner. Specific topics include the nature and public health impact of dissolvable tobacco products and the effects of altered nicotine on addiction.

Eligible nominees must be physicians, dentists, scientists, or health care professionals practicing in oncology, pulmonology, cardiology, toxicology, pharmacology, addiction, or any other related specialty. First consideration for membership will be given to those who apply before December 30th. Please visit the TPSAC website for more information.


15. 2014 CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: NATIONAL LEADERSHIP ACADEMY FOR THE PUBLIC’S HEALTH

CDC’s Office for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS), in partnership with the Office for Public Health Preparedness (OPHPR) and the Office of Non-communicable Diseases, Injury and Environmental Health (ONDIEH), has announced the 2014 Call for Applications for the National Leadership Academy for the Public’s Health (NLAPH). NLAPH is an applied leadership training program that enables multi-sector jurisdictional teams to address public health problems within their communities through team-identified health improvement projects.

Teams of four leaders from different sectors (public, private, non-profit, other) are invited to apply as a team. Examples of multi-sector teams include a representative from the city public health office, an urban planner, a business representative, and a local non-profit leader. Each team must have one member from the local, state or public health department. Applications are due November 26, 2013 by 5:00 PST. Team selections will be announced by December 20th, with the one-year program beginning January 2014.


16. UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY TEAM SEEKS MODELS OF COMMUNITY/CLINICAL COLLABORATION

The University of Kentucky College of Public Health has embarked on a study to identify, compare, and contrast models of collaboration involving community hospitals, public health departments, and other stakeholders who share a commitment to improving community health. The objectives of this study are to identify models of collaboration in improving community health that are operational and considered to be highly successful, examine these models in relation to specified questions and criteria, and produce insights that will assist policy makers and leaders of public and private organizations in building strong, successful partnerships designed to improve community health.

The study was launched in August, 2013, and is targeted for completion in September-October 2014. ACPM Past President Douglas Scutchfield, MD, MPH, FACPM, is serving as co-principal investigator.


17. NIH SEEKS INPUT ON OFFICE OF DISEASE PREVENTION DRAFT STRATEGIC PLAN

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Disease Prevention has announced an opportunity for public comment on its draft strategic plan for fiscal years 2014-2018. Following up on its previous request for comments on a strategic framework, the Office of Disease Prevention incorporated comments submitted by ACPM urging that the Office of Disease Prevention diversify its research methods and sources and work to engage children and teens in prevention research projects.

The strategic plan highlights the following six priorities: monitoring NIH investments in prevention research, identifying new areas for investment, promoting use of the best research methods, promoting collaborations between entities on prevention research projects, identifying and promoting the use of evidence-based interventions, and increasing the visibility of prevention research. The deadline to submit comments on the strategic plan is November 22nd.


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