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ACPM Headlines 10/16/15
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In this Issue

Top Stories

1. ACPM, Adult Vaccine Access Coalition launch campaign to boost vaccination rates

2. ACPM and Corporate Roundtable announce community event

3. Montefiore receives $1.2 million HRSA grant to launch first PMR

ACPM News

4. ACPM’s Annual Giving campaign will help medical students engage in PM

5. Career opportunities currently available in pharmacovigilance

6. ACPM opposes effort to defund Prevention and Public Health Fund

7. ACPM seeks nominee candidates for Community Preventive Services Task Force

8. Member participation needed in new ACPM CDC lifestyle medicine grant

Policy and Practice

9. This year’s flu shot expected to be more effective

10. EPA tightens ozone emission standard

11. JAMA Forum publishes piece by Gail Wilensky in support of AHRQ

Research and Reports

12. Bioactives and their role in preventive health for aging populations

13. Secondhand smoke may double risk of hospitalization for kids with asthma

14. AHRQ and NIH release Population Health–Behavioral and Social Insight

15. Seven out of 10 students who use tobacco use a flavored product

Announcements

16. Members in the news: Harmon, Lushniak, Miner, O’Malley

17. Jobs in PM: Meharry, CA Dept. of PH, RWJF Fellows program

18. Submit comments for Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization ACT of 2015

19. Community calendar: health promotion conference; alternate payment models


Top Stories

1. ACPM, ADULT VACCINE ACCESS COALITION LAUNCH CAMPAIGN TO BOOST VACCINATION RATES

With key leadership from ACPM, the Adult Vaccine Access Coalition has launched a campaign to boost adult vaccination rates, which lag far behind rates for children who generally need them in order to attend school. ACPM is a steering committee member of the coalition, which includes vaccine makers, public health organizations and health care providers who want to raise awareness of the poor uptake of adult vaccinations and the impact of these low rates.

For example, less than 40% of adults get the flu vaccine, and only about 20% of adults over age 60 get the shingles vaccine. AVAC notes that an estimated 50,000 adults die of vaccine-preventable diseases each year. AVAC’s goal is to advance the necessary policy changes to increase vaccination rates in order to save lives and reduce health care costs.


2.
ACPM AND ITS CORPORATE ROUNDTABLE ANNOUNCE THE BUILDING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES EVENT

Please join the American College of Preventive Medicine, together with the members of its Corporate Roundtable, for the Building Healthy Communities through Business, Culture and Policy event, a one-day symposium exploring the impact of a variety of societal influences on community health and unique solutions addressing lifestyle-related diseases.

The event will take place on February 23, 2016, one day prior to the start of Preventive Medicine 2016, in Washington, DC. Join Robin Schepper, Former Executive Director, Let's Move Initiative, Office of the First Lady of the United States, and now senior advisor to the Bipartisan Policy Center's Prevention Initiative, and others as we explore key questions related to community health and healthy living.

To register for the event please visit: Building Healthy Communities through Business, Culture and Policy or contact Maureen Simmons, MA, CFRE, Chief Development Officer at msimmons@acpm.org.


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MONTEFIORE RECEIVES $1.2 MILLION HRSA GRANT TO LAUNCH FIRST PM RESIDENCY PROGRAM

Montefiore Health System (MHS) has announced receipt of a three-year, $1.2 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to help develop and implement a new Preventive Medicine residency program, woven into an existing residency in family medicine. This four-year program, one of only a few in the U.S., will be the first to have an integrative health focus. It will launch in July 2016 with two residents.

"This grant from HRSA aligns with the goals of Montefiore’s approach to population health and is an important example of having a close relationship between translational science and education,” said ACPM member William Jordan, MD, MPH, director of the new PM residency program, co-director of Medical Student Education in the Department of Family and Social Medicine at Montefiore, and assistant professor in the department of Family and Social Medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. "We are delighted to develop the Preventive Medicine residency program and to welcome our first residents in just a few months.”

Montefiore is a premier academic health system at the University Hospital for Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York.


ACPM News

4. 2015 ANNUAL FUND: YOUR DONATION DOUBLES MEDICAL STUDENT PARTICIPATION AT CONFERENCE!

Thanks to generous donors like you, the American College of Preventive Medicine will now double the number (to 20) of "Future Leaders in Preventive Medicine” (FLPM) travel grants it makes available to eligible candidates to attend Preventive Medicine 2016, the annual meeting of the ACPM.

David Rainey, MD, MEd, a travel grant recipient in 2015, had this to share about his experience: "I want to express my gratitude to those members who made the medical student grants available to interested students like me, as the experience was influential in my decision to pursue preventive medicine training and active membership in the ACPM. I've attended and presented research at similar professional meetings in Dermatology, Radiation Oncology, and Medical Education, and the ACPM student grant program provided the best experience in terms of engaging and connecting me as a medical student to the professional society and potential mentors. If we are to attract bright and motivated students into the profession, this type of experience needs to be available and expanded so greater numbers of students can experience what Preventive Medicine and ACPM has to offer.Thank you again for the privilege of being granted the "Future Leaders in Preventive Medicine" scholarship for Preventive Medicine 2015.”

Eligible candidates for the FLPM grants must be medical students, ACPM members, and interested in preventive medicine and public health. Candidates selected to receive a travel grant within the last three years of Preventive Medicine 2016 are not eligible to apply. Applications are due November 1, 2015. Please visit ACPM Travel Grant for more information or to apply.

To support the FLPM program, make a donation today by visiting: ACPM Annual Fund. For more information about the ACPM annual fund please contact Maureen Simmons, MA, CFRE, Chief Development Officer at msimmons@acpm.org.

5. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES CURRENTLY AVAILBLE IN PHARMACOVIGILANCE

ACPM is sponsoring multiple clinical risk management and pharmacovigilance job opportunities for early-to-mid-career preventive medicine physicians at Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc. Successful applicants will be offered a full-time position monitoring the efficacy of Otsuka’s global drug and device products. The initial two-year training period includes rotating through different departments within Otsuka’s drug safety division in Princeton, New Jersey. Annual salary starts at $150,000.

If you are interested, please send a copy of your CV and a statement of interest to Paul Bonta at pbonta@acpm.org.


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ACPM OPPOSES EFFORT TO DEFUND PREVENTION AND PUBLIC HEALTH FUND

ACPM president Dan Blumenthal, MD, MPH, FACPM recently sent a letter to House Energy and Commerce Committee leadership opposing consideration of budget reconciliation instructions that aim to eliminate the $15.5 billion Prevention and Public Health Fund (Prevention Fund). Budget reconciliation instructions deplete the Prevention Fund largely as a means to pay for the elimination of provisions under the Affordable Care Act republicans in Congress have targeted.

Dr. Blumenthal states, "The Prevention Fund supports services and programs that improve health at the population level by supporting healthier lifestyles and eliminating obstacles to healthy life choices. For example, the Prevention Funds supports community-driven prevention efforts targeted at reducing tobacco use, increasing physical activity, improving nutrition, expanding mental health and injury prevention programs, and improving other prevention activities. Moreover, investing in prevention will reduce national health care expenditures by reducing the need for expensive treatment services. Given the importance of these community investments, ACPM will not support any proposal that diverts funds away from programs that improve our nation’s health and productivity.”


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ACPM SEEKING POTENTIAL NOMINEES FOR COMMUNITY PREVENTIVE SERVICES TASK FORCE

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Community Guide Branch has issued a Federal Register Notice to solicit nominations for qualified individuals interested in serving on the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force). Members are appointed by the CDC director and serve five-year terms, with possible extensions.

Nominees must demonstrate knowledge, experience, and national leadership in the following areas:

  • Critical evaluation of research or policy, or in the methods of evidence review
  • Research, evaluation, or implementation of community or health system-based programs, policies, or services to improve population health
  • To obtain diverse perspectives, CDC encourages nominations of women and members of minority populations. The Task Force will benefit from members with expertise in youth populations, environmental health, injury (in particular substance abuse and violence prevention), media, communications, and marketing, public health nursing, or economic analysis.

Should you wish to be considered as an ACPM nominee for membership on the Task Force, please complete the ACPM member volunteer form by Oct. 30th. Nominations must be submitted to CDC by November 9th.

For additional information please see the Federal Register Notice.


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MEMBER PARTICIPATION NEEDED IN NEW ACPM CDC LIFESTYLE MEDICINE GRANT

ACPM has received a grant to collaborate with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to create and deliver new lifestyle medicine education modules for providers in the CDC WISEWOMAN (Well-Integrated Screening and Evaluation for Women Across the Nation) program. During the one-year project, ACPM will research, develop, and disseminate new lifestyle medicine curriculum modules and educational materials designed specifically for the needs of WISEWOMAN providers, building off the comprehensive curriculum developed by ACPM and the American College of Lifestyle Medicine.

We have two exciting opportunities for ACPM members to participate in this work: (1) as faculty to help us develop 4-6 CME/MOC modules on cardiovascular disease in woman, or (2) as members of a new advisory board. The advisory board will help identify educational needs and practice gaps and make key recommendations and provide other input in the course of development of the new educational modules.

For both advisory board and faculty positions, ACPM is seeking members with expertise in cardiology, primary care, nutrition, behavior change and physicians who have practical experience clinically managing extremely low income populations. An ACPM all-member email will be sent next week with the more details, but please feel free to reach out to Dani Pere, Associate Executive Director, if you are interested in participating.


Policy and Practice

9. THIS YEAR’S FLU SHOT EXPECTED TO BE MORE EFFECTIVE

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), this year’s flu shot is expected to be more effective than in prior years. The CDC has been working with researchers at universities and hospitals as part of the U.S. Flu Vaccine Effectiveness (VE) Network since 2003 to estimate how well flu vaccine works through observational studies using laboratory-confirmed flu as the outcome. According to the agency, early tests point to a better match between circulating viruses and those found in the vaccine, making this year’s shot potentially more effective than last year’s.

"The 2015-2016 flu vaccine includes updated H3N2 and influenza B virus components," tweeted CDC director Tom Frieden, citing two strains of the virus that sickened many last season, even those who were immunized.

According to the CDC, all versions of this year’s vaccine will protect against three viruses (two A and one B). The quadrivalent vaccine will protect against an additional B virus.


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EPA TIGHTENS OZONE EMISSION STANDARD

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has moved to strengthen the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone to 70 parts per billion (ppb) from 75 ppb based on extensive scientific evidence about ozone’s effects on public health and welfare. The updated standards, coming after a thorough review and public comment process, will improve public health protection, particularly for at-risk groups including children, older adults, people of all ages who have lung diseases such as asthma, and people who are active outdoors, especially outdoor workers. They also will improve the health of trees, plants and ecosystems.

Public health benefits of the updated standards are significant – estimated at $2.9 to $5.9 billion annually in 2025 and outweighing estimated costs of $1.4 billion. EPA projections show the vast majority of U.S. counties will meet the standards by 2025 with federal and state rules and programs now in place or underway. EPA will work closely with states and tribes as they develop and implement clean air plans.


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JAMA FORUM PUBLISHES PIECE BY GAIL WILENSKY IN SUPPORT OF AHRQ

JAMA Forum has published an article from Gail Wilensky, PhD, "The Agency Under Threat That We Need Now More than Ever,” in support of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), which was proposed for elimination in the House FY 2016 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations bill. Dr. Wilensky is an economist and Senior Fellow at Project HOPE, an international health foundation, former director of the Health Care Financing Administration (now CMS), a senior adviser on health and welfare issues to President George H. W. Bush, and the first chair of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission.

In her piece, Dr. Wilensky explains why AHRQ is important in the context of the broader health care system and highlights some of its key contributions over the years. Dr. Wilensky further makes an appeal to members of all political parties noting why moves to reduce or eliminate AHRQ are short-sighted, given its function and purpose.

The letter states, "Eliminating or gutting the agency that focuses on these issues and on ways to reduce health care spending and improve quality could hardly come at a less opportune time. Everyone in Congress, including Republicans who want to improve or replace the ACA, should be interested in gaining a better understanding of the ACA’s effects and the likely effects of any proposed alternatives to the law.”


Research and Reports

12. BIOACTIVES AND THEIR ROLE IN PREVENTIVE HEALTH FOR AGING POPULATIONS

As the population ages, the importance of exploring the role of food and food components in preventive health has never been more important. An emerging body of evidence suggests tremendous promise of bioactive compounds in supporting healthy aging.

What are bioactive compounds? What does the latest research tell us about their role in preventive health for aging populations? What gaps in research exist? The answers to these questions were explored during the 2015 Healthy Aging Summit. Susan Peschin, MHS, President and CEO, Alliance for Aging Research, led a panel discussion on the potential impact of bioactive research, innovation and policy on aging populations. She was joined by leading experts in the fields of nutrition and preventive health. Click here to learn key insights stemming from this dynamic dialogue.


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SECONDHAND SMOKE MAY DOUBLE RISK OF HOSPITALIZATION FOR KIDS WITH ASTHMA

According to an article published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, children with asthma are twice as likely to be hospitalized from exposure to second hand smoke (SHS), when compared to children without asthma. Parents of kids with asthma need to be aware of these increased risks since SHS can worsen symptoms and make asthma more difficult to control.

The article reviewed 25 studies comprising 450,000 children with an average age of 7.6 years. Researchers of the study explained that the children are more negatively affected than adults when exposed to SHS because their lungs and immune system are still developing. According to the study, secondhand smoke can also inhibit the growth of the lungs. Controlling asthma can reduce emergency room visits, hospitalizations and improve proper use of long-term controlled medications. Family-centered tobacco control programs help to address tobacco use of parents when their child with asthma comes to clinic for a visit.


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AHRQ AND NIH RELEASE POPULATION HEALTH: BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE INSIGHT

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) Office Social and Behavioral Science Research has released a book titled Population Health: Behavioral and Social Science Insight. The book is a collection of papers that highlights the contributions of behavioral and social sciences to population health. It addresses what we know and what we need to learn about the effect of behavioral and social factors on longevity, disability, illness and quality of life at the population level.

The book also discusses several social determinants of health such as access to healthcare, education, nutrition, physical activity, and use of tobacco products, among others. Several chapters focus on methods to improve behavioral and social science research, which may lead to interventions that improve health and well-being of individuals and populations with common risk factors.


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SEVEN OF 10 STUDENTS WHO USE TOBACCO USE OF A FLAVORED PRODUCT

Among middle and high school students who used a tobacco product within the past thirty days, 70% reported using at least one flavored tobacco product, according to a recent Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report(MMWR) published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration(FDA). This included 1.58 million e-cigarette users, 1.02 million hookah users, 910,000 cigar smokers, and 900,000 menthol cigarette smokers. Consequently, millions of youths are exposed, through inhalation or oral absorption, to nicotine and harmful constituents from these tobacco products. The report notes that nicotine exposure during adolescence, a critical window for brain development, causes addiction, is more likely to lead to sustained tobacco use, and might have lasting adverse consequences for brain development.

The popularity of flavors across the range of tobacco products suggests that flavoring might have broad appeal to young tobacco users. Therefore, the MMWR notes the importance of comprehensive tobacco prevention and control strategies for youths that address all forms of flavored tobacco products and not just cigarettes.


Announcements

16. MEMBERS IN THE NEWS: HARMON, LUSHNIAK, MINER, O’MALLEY

  • Robert Harmon, MD, MPH, FACPM:ACPM past-president, Robert Harmon, MD, MPH, FACPM, was awarded the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) Alumni Award at ASTHO’s annual meeting last month. Congratulations Dr. Harmon!
  • Boris Lushniak, MD, MPH: Retired Rear Adm. Boris D. Lushniak, MD, MPH, former Deputy Surgeon General of the United States, will join the faculty of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU) F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, effective in November 2015. Lushniak was selected as the school’s Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics department chair. Congratulations Dr. Lushniak!
  • Joseph Miner, MD, MSPH, FACPM: ACPM Fellow, Joseph Miner, MD, MPH, FACPM, is the newly appointed Utah Commissioner of Health. Congratulations Dr. Miner on your new position!
  • Ann O Malley, MD, FACPM: ACPM Fellow Ann O’Malley, MD, FACPM, has co-authored an article in Health Affairs, called "Measuring What Matters in Primary Care.” The article provides an overview of the characteristics of primary care, along with reasons, barriers, and best approaches to measure primary care.


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JOBS IN PREVENTIVE MEDICINE: MEHARRY, CA DEPT OF PH, RWJF FELLOWS PROGRAM

  • Meharry Medical College is looking for a BC/BE Occupational Medicine physician to serve as the Medical Director of the Student and Employee Health Clinic, as well as serving as faculty in the Occupational and Preventive Medicine residencies. For more information, click here.


    Interested candidates should send a copy of their curriculum vitae to:
    Bridgette Kallon, M.B.A.
    Fiscal Officer, School of Medicine
    Meharry Medical College
    1005 Dr. D. B. Todd, Jr. Boulevard
    Nashville, Tennessee 37208
    bbirch@mmc.edu
    615-327-6090

  • Public Health Administrator 1: The Chronic Disease Control Branch within the California Department of Public Health is looking for a board-certified physician in general preventive medicine/public health or other specialty to fill the duties of a Public Health Administrator. This person will oversee statewide public health programs that address prevention and management of chronic disease. To learn more about the job description, qualifications and other information, please click here.

  • The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellows program 2016-2017 Call for Applications is now open. Deadline for receipt of applications via the RWJF online system is November 12, 2015, at 3:00pm ET. Conducted and administered by the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) since 1973, the non-partisan fellowship offers exclusive, hands-on policy experience with the most influential congressional and executive offices in the nation’s capital. For more information and to apply, click here.


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SUBMIT COMMENTS FOR MEDICARE ACCESS AND CHIP REAUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2015

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is currently seeking public input to help properly implement several provisions in the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA). MACRA became law earlier this year and replaces the Medicare Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) methodology with the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) to provide updates to the Physician Fee Schedule (PFS). MACRA also promotes creation of Alternative Payment Models (APM) and provides incentives for eligible professionals who participate in APM. The comments are due by 11:59 PM on November 02, 2015. Click here to learn more information and submit a comment.


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FROM THE ACPM COMMUNITY CALENDAR

  • Health Care Payment Learning and Action Network (LAN) Summit: CMS Alliance to Modernize Healthcare (CAMH) is organizing a day-long summit to engage various stakeholders, including providers, payers, health systems, consumer groups, purchasers, and federal and state government officials who have experience in designing and implementing alternative payment models. The summit will take place on Monday October 26, 2015 in Arlington, VA. Click here to register for the summit, access the full agenda, and learn more about the speakers and topics covered.

  • The 26th Annual Art and Science of Health Promotion Conference, April 25-29, 2016, at the Hilton Orlando Lake Buena Vista in Orlando, Florida, brings together more than 600 professionals with a passion for health promotion. The three-day core conference will feature three inspiring and thought-provoking keynote addresses, concurrent sessions presented by the top scientists and practitioners in the field, plus many opportunities to collaborate through interactive discussions, networking sessions, fitness activities and social events. The conference will also feature two-day pre-conference Intensive Training Seminars and the WELCOA National Training Summit. Complete program details, schedule updates and registration information are available at http://www.HealthPromotionConference.com.

Visit ACPM’s online Community Calendar on the right side of its home page or directly here for more events of interest to the preventive medicine community.


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