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ACPM Headlines 9/4/15
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In this Issue

Top Stories

1. ACPM announces collaborative with CDC’s WISEWOMAN program

2. ACPM to develop CPT code for falls risk assessment in older adults

3. CDC Vital Signs: Most Americans’ hearts are older than their age

ACPM News

4. ACPM provides resources for health systems transformation

5. ACPM to host webinar on scientific abstract writing

6. Corporate Roundtable Member Profile: Purdue Pharma

Policy and Practice

7. FDA extends comment period for e-cigarette regulations

8. ACPM joins sign-on letter on antimicrobial animal drug sales and reporting

9. AHA recommends screening teens with depression for heart disease

Research and Reports

10. From JAMA: Physical activity, supplements fail to fight cognitive decline

11. New CDC tool illustrates changes in antibiotic resistance

12. CDC report: One in four senior women in U.S. have osteoporosis

13. E-cigarettes may spur teens to try smoking

Announcements

14. HHS offers webinar on eHealth tools

15. CDC offers webinar on state strategies to improve population health

16. Preventive medicine physician sought for county health officer position in Indiana

17. Members in the news: Gregory Holzman, MD, MPH


Top Stories

1. ACPM ANNOUNCES COLLABORATIVE WITH CDC’S WISEWOMAN PROGRAM

ACPM has received a grant to collaborate with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to create and deliver new lifestyle medicine education modules for providers in the CDC WISEWOMAN (Well-Integrated Screening and Evaluation for Women Across the Nation) program. Administered through CDC's Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention (DHDSP), the WISEWOMAN program provides low-income, under-insured or uninsured women in 20 states and two tribes with chronic disease risk factor screening, lifestyle programs, and referral services to prevent cardiovascular disease.

During the one-year project, ACPM will research, develop, and disseminate new lifestyle medicine curriculum modules and educational materials designed specifically for the needs of WISEWOMAN providers, building off the comprehensive curriculum developed by ACPM and the American College of Lifestyle Medicine. ACPM also will evaluate the reach and impact of educational activities and materials to identify gaps in the knowledge base and improve ACPM’s dissemination strategy. Utilizing a multi-pronged strategy, ACPM will disseminate the new educational modules to WISEWOMAN grantees, providers, and ACPM members through various channels and venues, including three regional trainings in WISEWOMAN grantee states, ACPM’s annual conference, webinars, conference calls, newsletter, website, online educational library, and social media.

ACPM has begun a search for a new Project Director to lead the project under ACPM’s Associate Executive Director for Programs. Please share this announcement with any potential candidates, and stay tuned for more information about the project and ways to engage in the coming weeks.

2. ACPM TO DEVELOP CPT CODE FOR FALLS RISK ASSESSMENT IN OLDER ADULTS

ACPM was awarded a grant by the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to develop a new CPT code that will allow providers to be reimbursed for completing a falls risk assessment in older adults. ACPM will collaborate with several national medical societies, including the American Academy of Family Physicians, American College of Physicians, and American Geriatrics Society to submit a new CPT code request to the AMA, which governs the CPT code development process.

ACPM is seeking volunteers with expertise in falls risk assessment to join its advisory committee to determine the CPT code descriptor, or scope of work, for the falls risk assessment service. Interested volunteers should have some knowledge of the CPT reimbursement process in addition to expertise in falls risk assessment in older adults. If interested, please contact Paul Bonta at pbonta@acpm.org.

3. MOST U.S. ADULTS’ "HEART AGE” HIGHER THAN CHRONOLOGICAL AGE

Three out of four U.S. adults have a predicted heart age that is older than their actual age, according to a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Vital Signs report.

"Heart age” is the calculated age of a person’s cardiovascular system based on his or her risk factor profile. The risks include high blood pressure, cigarette smoking, diabetes status, and body mass index as an indicator for obesity.

Among the report’s key findings, overall, the average heart age for adult men is eight years older than their chronological age, compared to five years older for women. Also, although heart age exceeds chronological age for all race/ethnic groups, it is highest among African-American men and women (average of 11 years older for both).

The Vital Signs report on "Predicted Heart Age (HA) and Racial Disparities in Heart Age among U.S. Adults at the State Level” is the first study to provide population-level estimates of heart age and to highlight disparities in heart age nationwide. CDC researchers used risk factor data collected from every U.S. state and information from the Framingham Heart Study.

ACPM News

4. ACPM PROVIDES RESOURCES FOR HEALTH SYSTEMS TRANSFORMATION

ACPM has compiled a number of resources on its recently updated webpage for members and others who are interested in health systems transformation and facilitating the integration of primary care and public health. ACPM defines health systems transformation (HST) as "Systems-based approaches to improving population, community, and individual health by incorporating and addressing the determinants of health and increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of health care.”

Please contact ACPM’s project administrator to join the growing HST listserv, where you can interact with professionals on a wide variety of topics including quality of care, payment and delivery reform, and preventive medicine leadership. Once you sign up, you will receive a monthly newsletter that highlights the latest developments in HST and other exciting opportunities for professional development and leadership. The September newsletter is now posted on the webpage. You can also sign up for Modern Healthcare’s day-long virtual conference on October 21 where many of these timely topics will be discussed.

5. ACPM TO HOST WEBINAR ON SCIENTIFIC ABSTRACT WRITING

ACPM will be hosting the webinar, Development of Public Health Abstracts for Acceptance at Scientific Conferences, on Thursday, September 17th. This exciting webinar is open to all who are interested, but is designed especially for students, trainees, and junior researchers who want to increase their skills and confidence in developing abstracts for acceptance at scientific conferences.

Attendees will learn guidelines and tips for creating competitive abstracts, common reasons abstracts are rejected and how to avoid these errors. This webinar will help make the preparation of an abstract for a peer reviewed conference less daunting.

Join Dr. Edward Weiss on Thursday, September 17th, at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time for this unique opportunity.

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Apply principles of effective abstract writing when preparing abstracts of their original scientific work for submission to national conferences.
  • Identify and avoid common errors in scientific abstracts that detract from effective communication of scientific findings.

ACPM Members: $15

ACPM Non-Members: $25

This webinar offers up to1 AMA Category 1 Credit and Maintenance of Certification (MOC) credit toward the American Board of Preventive Medicine requirements.

Register Here!

6. CORPORATE ROUNDTABLE MEMBER PROFILE: PURDUE PHARMA

Corporate Roundtable member, Purdue Phama, recently introduced Team Against Opioid Abuse, a website designed to help healthcare professionals and laypersons learn about different abuse-deterrent technologies and how they can help in the reduction of misuse and abuse of opioids. "Education about the proper use of opioid analgesics is a top priority at Purdue Pharma, said J. David Haddox, DDS, MD, Vice President, Health Policy, Purdue Pharma L.P. "Everyone on the team should understand their role and responsibilities, so they can do their part in combating abuse of opioids, while ensuring their availability for appropriate purposes.”

Purdue Pharma believes combating misuse and intentional abuse of prescription pain relievers involves more than just the person holding the prescription pad. It is a team effort, including pharmacists, nurses, counselors, caregivers, patients, and payers, both public- and private-sector. "Opioids with Abuse-Deterrent Properties are one tool to help the team in their efforts in fighting drug abuse. We developed this website to inform everyone who influences how drugs are prescribed, taken, stored, and destroyed, when no longer needed,” said Dr. Haddox.

Opioid abuse is a critical problem in America and one that healthcare professionals, payers, law enforcement, policymakers and drug makers are all working to combat. The 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health reported that, among persons age 12 or older in 2012 to 2013, approximately 68 percent of people who used prescription pain relievers for nonmedical purposes said they got the medicines from a friend or relative, for free, by purchase, or by theft. In 2011, the White House identified prescription drug abuse and misuse as a major public health and public safety crisis.

For more information about the ACPM Corporate Roundtable please contact Maureen Simmons, MA, CFRE, Chief Development Officer, at msimmons@acpm.org.

Policy and Practice

7. FDA EXTENDS COMMENT PERIOD FOR E-CIGARETTE REGULATIONS

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has extended the comment period to September 30th for its proposed regulation to ensure children are protected from e-cigarettes and liquid nicotine. The agency published an advanced notice of proposed rulemaking in July, citing increased calls and visits to poison centers and hospital emergency departments. It is considering warnings about nicotine exposure and whether some products should be sold in child-resistant packaging.

8. ACPM JOINS LETTER ON ANTIMICROBIAL ANIMAL DRUG SALES AND REPORTING

ACPM joined organizations in medicine and public health on a sign-on letter to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) acting commissioner Stephen Ostroff, MD, in support of the agency’s proposed rule, "Antimicrobial Animal Drug Sales and Distribution Reporting.” The proposed rule was released in May to improve data reporting on antibiotic sales for food-producing livestock and poultry.

The letter states, "Our organizations believe that the current requirements for data reporting are not robust enough to provide the information needed to monitor the usage of life-saving antibiotics and protect human health. We therefore strongly support FDA’s proposal to require reporting of species-specific estimates of antimicrobial sales for cattle, swine, chickens, and turkeys. These additional data would enhance our understanding of which antimicrobials are sold for use in food-producing animals.”

9. HEART ASSOCIATION RECOMMENDS SCREENING TEENS WITH DEPRESSION FOR HEART DISEASE

The American Heart Association has rigorously analyzed available evidence and recommended monitoring teens with Major Depressive Disorder (MPD) and Bipolar Disorder (BD) for risk of heart disease. The recommendations were released after reviewing published studies that showed that teens with MPD or BD were more likely than other teens to have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, type 2 diabetes and hardening of the arteries.

The reasons for the increased risk are unclear, but it is known that teens with mood disorders are more likely to have unhealthy habits such as smoking, drug use and physical inactivity. However, these factors alone do not explain the increased risk. Additionally some medications that treat mood disorders can lead to weight gain, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and high sugar levels, though among the studies that were reviewed, most children were not taking these medications.

Mood disorders are lifelong conditions and the authors of the study hope the recommendation would encourage health care providers to take appropriate action to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease among youth.

Research and Reports

10. IN RECENT STUDIES PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, SUPPLEMENTS FAIL TO FIGHT COGNITIVE DECLINE

Results from two high-quality studies to evaluate the influence of lifestyle interventions on cognitive outcomes in the most recent issue of JAMA showed that neither physical activity nor omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants had cognitive benefits among sedentary older adults. The results of these two studies, both secondary analyses of randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs), conflict with much of the existing literature on the effects of exercise and diet interventions on cognitive decline and dementia.

The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) trial found that, among sedentary older adults, a 24-month moderate-intensity physical activity program compared with a health education program did not result in improvements in global or domain-specific cognitive function. In the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2), results show no change in cognitive function scores with supplements of either long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) or lutein combined with zeaxanthin when compared to placebo.

The authors of the LIFE trial study offer a variety of possible explanations for the apparent conflicting results of studies designed to examine the relationship between exercise and cognitive function, but note the need for further studies. Likewise, observational studies have shown that people who eat diets rich in fish and antioxidants have better brain health, but they only prove an association, not a cause-and-effect relationship. In the AREDS-2 study, it is not known whether longer use of the supplements or use in younger test subjects would have shown a benefit.

11. NEW CDC TOOL ILLUSTRATES CHANGES IN ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released a new tool called NARMS (National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System) Now: Human Data, which allows users to access antibiotic resistance data by bacteria, antibiotic, year (1996-2013), and geographic region. The tool displays data on an interactive map or in tables and is designed to provide access to the most up-to-date antibiotic resistance results by uploading data as soon as isolate testing is completed.

CDC estimates that each year in the United States, 2 million illnesses and 23,000 deaths are caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Antibiotic-resistant infections from germs transmitted commonly through food cause an estimated 440,000 of those illnesses.

12. CDC REPORT: ONE IN FOUR SENIOR WOMEN IN U.S HAVE OSTEOPOROSIS

According to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a quarter of all American women over the age of 65 have osteoporosis. The study was based on examining the 2005-2010 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a federal government survey. According to the report, close to 6% of men in this age group also have osteoporosis.

Nearly half of all seniors (48%) have osteopenia, a condition that is a precursor to osteoporosis. Demographically, Mexican-Americans had the highest rate of osteoporosis at 25%, and Blacks had the lowest rate at 10%. Additionally the rate of osteoporosis rose with age, where 26% of seniors over the age of 80 had the condition. Screening is recommended for postmenopausal women over the age of 50 and above, or for all women aged 70 and above and men aged 80 and above.

13. E-CIGARETTES MAY SPUR TEENS TO TRY SMOKING

According to a study published in Journal of the American Medical Association, use of e-cigarettes by teenagers could be a stepping stone to smoking. Los-Angeles area teenagers were three to four times more likely to experiment with tobacco products after they tried e-cigarettes. This is the first study that has shown potential link between e-cigarette use and smoking in teenagers. Researchers think that because teenagers enjoy inhaling nicotine from e-cigarettes, they are more likely to try other products that involve inhaling nicotine.

Since this was an observational study, a cause and effect link cannot be determined, and the study did not ascertain whether, after a year, the kids only tried one cigarette or become regular smokers. E-cigarettes have been manufactured and marketed as a safer alternative to tobacco; and as a tool to help adults quit smoking. The study did take into consideration other risk factors for teenagers including impulsive tendencies, depression, use of other drugs and whether family and friends are smokers.

Announcements

14. HHS OFFERS WEBINAR ON eHEALTH TOOLS

The HHS Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, in partnership with the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology and Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, will host a two-part webinar series "Increasing Consumer Use of Recommended Preventive Services Using eHealth Tools" to discuss how eHealth tools can increase the use of recommended clinical preventive services. Health professionals can leverage consumer-facing eHealth tools to reach consumers in new ways through the use of application programming interfaces, content syndication, and the interoperability of electronic health records. Part one of the webinar series will take place on September 10 from 2-3 p.m. EDT.

15. CDC OFFERS WEBINAR ON STATE STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE POPULATION HEALTH

CDC will host the webinar, "State Strategies to Improve Population Health and Control Cost," on September 8 from 3-4 p.m. EDT. The webinar will provide specific, evidence-based population health strategies that can be integrated into healthcare delivery systems to improve health outcomes that are cost neutral or can show a positive return on investment within three to five years.

Participants will hear from CDC, the National Governors Association, and the Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services leadership about coordinated implementation of the select population health strategies.

16. PREVENTIVE MEDICINE PHYSICIAN SOUGHT FOR COUNTY HEALTH OFFICER POSITION IN INDIANA

The Board of Health of St. Joseph County, Indiana is seeking a strategic leader to be its full- time Health Officer. The Board is committed to a collaborative model and partnerships with local health systems, colleges and universities, community non-profits and local government in order to improve the health of county residents.

The job would work in tandem with a full time departmental administrator to manage six divisions and 45 employees. St. Joseph County’s population is mixed urban, suburban and rural and is ranked mid-range in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s County Health Rankings for Indiana.

Interested candidates should contact the current interim health officer Dale Deardorff, MD, at healthofficer@co.st-joseph.in.us.

17. MEMBERS IN THE NEWS: GREGORY HOLZMAN, MD, MPH

ACPM member Gregory Holzman, MD, MPH, has been hired as the State Medical Officer of the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services. Previously, Dr. Holzman was an associate professor of Preventive Medicine at Michigan State University where he spearheaded the Healthy Campus Initiative. Dr. Holzman also has prior state and federal government experience as a Chief Medical Executive in Michigan and served as the Deputy Director of the Office of State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He is an active member of ACPM and currently serves as the Chair of the Policy Committee. Congratulations Dr. Holzman!

 



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