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ACPM Headlines 7/24/15
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July 24, 2015

In this Issue

Top Stories

1. Still time to register for Healthy Aging Summit, July 27-28, in Washington, DC

2. Preparing for the Boards? ACPM has your solutions

3. ACPM receives new four-year accreditation to provide CME

4. CDC reports heroin use increasing across the U.S.

ACPM News

5. Registration now open for ACPM Lifestyle Medicine Curriculum Symposium

6. Final call to order In-service Exams

7. ACPM signs letter opposing efforts to weaken Tobacco Control Act

Policy and Practice

8. Health disparities persist even with ACA gains

9. Use of clinical preventive services varies by income, insurance status

10. HPV vaccination rates remain low

11. FDA issues proposed rule on nicotine exposure and child-resistant packaging

Research and Reports

12. Cause of community acquired pneumonia difficult to detect

13. Over 70% of adults with existing ASCVD reported using aspirin regularly

14. Secondhand smoke raises stroke risk

Announcements

15. Climate Health Summit

16. Healthy Outlook:Public Health Resources on Health Systems Transformation

17. AAMC seeking testimonials to promote Preventive Medicine to medical students


Top Stories

1ON-SITE REGISTRATION STILL OPEN FOR NEXT WEEK’S HEALTHY AGING SUMMIT IN WASHINGTON, DC!

ACPM, along with the Office of Disease and Health Promotion, is co-sponsoring the Healthy Aging Summit next week in Washington, DC. Onsite registration is still available!

Highlights of the summit include:

  • Up to 11.25 hours of Continuing Medical Education (CME), Certified Health Education Specials (CHES), and Nursing credits.

  • Colin Milner, CEO of the International Council on Active Aging and a leading authority on the health and well-being of older adults, will deliver a thought-provoking keynote session on the possibilities surrounding population aging.

  • Plenary speakers from the World Health Organization, National Institute on Aging, Administration on Community Living, AARP, and the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials - among others- will speak on topics including Leadership in Aging, Geroscience, Cognitive Health and Preventing Cognitive Impairment, International Perspectives on Aging, and more.

  • More than 65 expert presenters will lead 20 concurrent sessions in 4 tracks on topics including health and health care, quality of life in aging, social and community context, and neighborhood and the built environment.

To learn more, please visit the summit website.


2.
PREPARING FOR THE BOARDS? LET ACPM BE YOUR ONE-STOP RESOURCE

The ACPM Board Review Course, to be held August 22-26 in Baltimore, MD, will feature a comprehensive review of the ABPM study guide and provide a unique opportunity to earn up to 38.5 Continuing Medical Education (CME) and Maintenance of Certification (MOC) credits.


Topics to be covered include:

  • Epidemiology
  • Biostatistics
  • Health Services Management
  • Clinical Preventive Medicine
  • Behavior and Mental Health
  • Environmental Health
  • Infectious Disease
  • Public Health Law

Specialty breakout sessions in Public Health/General Preventive Medicine, Aerospace Medicine, and Occupational Medicine will also be available.

Advanced registration is open until Monday, August 10. Register now and save. To register for ACPM's Board Review Course, please visit our website.

If you cannot attend the course in person, you can pre-order the 2015 Annual Board Review Course Syllabus and/or online recordings. Orders received by August 1st will receive a $50 discount. The syllabus will be available mid-late August and online recordings will be available several weeks after the Review Course takes place. If you want study materials sooner, you can order the 2014 syllabus and/or DVD that will be processed soon after ordering.To place an order, click here.


3.
ACPM RECEIVES NEW FOUR-YEAR ACCREDITATION TO PROVIDE CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION

ACPM is pleased to announce that it has successfully completed its reaccreditation process with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) and has been granted "Accreditation” status until July 2019.

ACPM recognizes Haydee Barno, MBA, CMP-HC, director of continuing education, for her tireless work in shepherding the organization through the reaccreditation process and in assuring compliance with ACCME rules throughout the accreditation cycle, as well as ACPM’s CME/MOC Committee, chaired by ACPM Regent Wendy Braund, MD, MPH, FACPM, for its steady oversight of ACPM’s CME program. ACPM is committed to providing the highest level of Continuing Medical Education programs for its members and physicians in general. ACPM has been accredited by the ACCME to provide CME since June 2, 1975.


4.
CDC REPORTS HEROIN USE INCREASING ACROSS THE U.S.

The Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC) has reported in its monthly Vital Signs report that heroin use has increased among most demographic groups in the past decade, including more than doubling among young adults ages 18–25. Between 2002 and 2013, the rate of heroin-related overdose deaths nearly quadrupled. More than 8,200 people died from heroin in 2013.

With this news, CDC also released prevention steps that state and health care providers can take to curb the rising use of heroin, which focus on addressing the strongest risk factor for heroin addiction—addiction to prescription opioid painkillers: increase access to substance abuse treatment services, including Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT), for opioid addiction; expand access to and training for administering naloxone to reduce opioid overdose deaths; ensure that people have access to integrated prevention services, including access to sterile injection equipment from a reliable source, as allowed by local policy; help local jurisdictions put these effective practices to work in communities where drug addiction is common; and work with law enforcement at the local, state, and federal levels to reduce the supply of heroin.

For more information visit www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns.


ACPM News

5. REGISTRATION NOW OPEN FOR ACPM LIFESTYLE MEDICINE CURRICULUM SYMPOSIUM

ACPM and its partner the American College of Lifestyle Medicine (ACLM) are excited to offer a special educational opportunity for its members to learn about lifestyle medicine—the recommended foundational approach to preventing and treating the majority of chronic diseases affecting Americans. Please join us August 23-24th for the Lifestyle Medicine Curriculum Symposium in Baltimore.

The symposium will focus on the clinical processes that ensure quality lifestyle interventions for preventing, treating, and reversing chronic diseases, and it is just one part of a comprehensive lifestyle medicine curriculum that will be released soon. Registration includes up to 12 hours of CME and MOC credits, refreshments, and all learning materials. Attendees also receive a 15% discount on the online lifestyle medicine curriculum.Early registration ends August 10th. For more information and to register click here.


6.
LAST CALL TO ORDER 2015 IN-SERVICE EXAM

There's still time to order the 2015 Preventive Medicine In-Service Examination, scheduled for August 1-31, 2015. This 2.25 hour electronic exam, administered annually, enables residents and program directors to determine if there are specific areas where more study and training are needed. It is a voluntary exam that allows residents to compare themselves with others at the same level nationally.

Though not intended to be an examination preparation tool, the In-service Exam can be a gauge of how well residents are being trained and prepared for the content of the American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) examination. It is designed for residents in all specialty areas of preventive medicine. The material covered in the In-service Exam relates to the core (morning) portion of the ABPM certification exam.

For more information and the order form, please visit: http://www.acpm.org/?InserviceExamination


7.
ACPM SIGNS LETTER OPPOSING EFFORTS TO WEAKEN TOBACCO CONTROL ACT

ACPM, in partnership with the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids and 40 medical and public health organizations, cosigned a letter to the House Appropriations Committee expressing opposition to Section 747 of the House Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies appropriations bill for Fiscal Year 2016. This rider, which would exempt new tobacco products from U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) review, would weaken the Tobacco Control Act (TCA).

According to the TCA, any new tobacco products introduced or modified after February 15, 2007, must be reviewed by the FDA before they can be sold. Section 747 would change this ‘grandfather’ date for products such as e-cigarettes and hookahs that are not yet deemed ‘tobacco products’ by the FDA for regulation.


Policy and Practice

8. HEALTH COVERAGE DISPARITIES PERSIST EVEN WITH ACA COVERAGE GAINS

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed that though fewer adults between ages 18-64 were uninsured in 2014 compared with 2013, large coverage gaps persist among Hispanic and black adults compared with White and Asian adults. About 34.1% of Hispanics remained uninsured in 2014, compared to 17.6% of blacks, 12.1% of Asians and 11.5% of whites.

Not all states chose to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act and lawmakers' decision to opt out left an estimated 14.4 million adults ineligible for subsidized health plans under the law, including 3.6 million Hispanics and 2.9 million black adults, an analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation shows. The uninsured are less likely to get preventive screening or care for chronic disease and have higher mortality rates.


9
.
USE OF CLINICAL PREVENTIVE SERVICES VARIES BY INSURANCE STATUS AND INCOME

More people with health insurance coverage received each of nine preventive services than those without coverage, according to data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) analyzed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Additionally, persons with family incomes >200% of the Federal Poverty Line received these preventive services at a higher prevalence compared with those with incomes below that threshold for eight of nine services.

The NHIS questioned a representative sample of persons, 18 and over, on nine clinical preventive services they received in 2011-2012. The nine services, all recommended by the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPTF) and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), include:1) blood pressure screening, 2) cholesterol screening, 3) colon cancer screening, 4) diet counseling, 5) fasting blood glucose test (diabetes screening), 6) hepatitis A vaccination, 7) hepatitis B vaccination, 8) mammogram (breast cancer screening), and 9) Pap test (cervical cancer screening).

The survey could serve as a baseline for future surveys of preventive services covered and received through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) after 2012. The ACA allows public and private health insurance plans to offer preventive services without cost-sharing. Hence, increasing enrollment and retention in coverage likely would allow an increase in the use of preventive services and reduce avoidable complications, illnesses and premature deaths.


10
.
STATES STILL HESITANT TO REQUIRE HPV VACCINES

Vaccination rates of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) are far below the Healthy People 2020 target of 80%, according to a new study in JAMA. Only 37.6% of adolescent girls and 13.9% of adolescent boys completed the three-dose requirement in 2013, according to CDC.

The vaccine was first recommended eight years ago by the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) to all 11 and 12 year old boys and girls. However, vaccination uptake has been slow for a variety of reasons, including that very few states require the HPV vaccine. Currently only Virginia and District of Columbia require the vaccine, allowing for broad exemptions, and Rhode Island will require the vaccine in August. Another reason is that the total cost of the three-dose vaccine is $500 for those who lack insurance coverage. Although government programs help subsidize the cost and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires coverage for the vaccine without cost-sharing, the public may be unaware of these options.

The HPV vaccine can protect against multiple strains of the sexually transmitted papilloma virus which can cause genital warts, cervical, anal, penal and throat cancer. According to the CDC, approximately 79 million Americans are infected with HPV, with 14 million new infections each year.


11.
FDA ISSUES PROPOSED RULE ON NICOTINE EXPOSURE AND CHILD-RESISTANT PACKAGING

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has released a proposed rule on nicotine exposure warning and child-resistant packaging for liquid nicotine, nicotine-containing e-liquid(s), and other tobacco products such as lotions, gels, and drinks. The FDA is seeking additional information on whether it would be appropriate to warn the public about the dangers of nicotine exposure and require certain tobacco products to be sold in child-resistant packaging. The FDA is seeking data, research and additional evidence to make the best decision about possible regulatory actions. The proposal will be available for public comments until August 31, 2015.

There has been a sharp rise in the popularity of electronic cigarettes, which contain liquid nicotine and nicotine containing e-liquids that has led to an increase in calls to poison centers and visits to emergency rooms related to nicotine poisoning.


Research and Reports

12. CAUSE OF COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA DIFFICULT TO DETECT

A new study released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the New England Journal of Medicine showed that viruses are more often to blame than bacteria in community acquired pneumonia infections, but lack sufficient detection through standard diagnostic testing. The CDC Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study showed that although pneumonia is a leading cause of hospitalization and death among adults in the United States, current diagnostic tests do not accurately identify causes of pneumonia.


13
.
OVER 70% OF ADULTS WITH EXISTING ASCVD REPORT USING ASPIRIN REGULARLY

Overall, 70.8% of adults with existing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) reported using aspirin at least once a day or every other day, according to data analyzed from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) conducted in 20 states and District of Columbia. Among these daily users, 93.6% reported using aspirin for heart attack prevention, 79.6% for stroke prevention, and 76.2% for both heart attack and stroke prevention.

Additionally, the survey showed that there were geographic and sociodemographic differences in aspirin use. In general, respondents over the age of 65, men, non-Hispanic whites, and those with at least 2 ASCVD risk factors were more likely to use aspirin. Public health practitioners and clinicians can use the data from this report to target programs and interventions to increase aspirin use among specific subgroups with ASCVD including women, black and Hispanic patients and those younger than 65, to reduce the disparity in aspirin use.

The use of aspirin as a secondary prevention to reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke, and other cardiac events among people with preexisting atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is well established and recommended in multiple national programs such as Million Hearts Initiative and Healthy People 2020.


14
.
SECONDHAND SMOKE RAISES STROKE RISK

According to a study published in the June issue of AJPM, second hand smoke (SHS) independently increases the risk of stroke by 30%, after adjusting for socioeconomic factors, smoking history, Framingham Stroke risk factors, and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration. The study analyzed participants of Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS), a population-based longitudinal study looking at white and African Americans over the age of 45. Compared to those without exposure to SHS, exposed study participants were more likely to be female, white, and younger, reside with a smoker and have lower education levels.

Smoking is a well-known, major risk factor for stroke, but the studies linking SHS exposure and stroke are inconsistent. Further studies are needed to confirm the findings and examine the long-term effects of SHS exposure on stoke outcomes.


Announcements

15. CLIMATE HEALTH SUMMIT

Physicians for Social Responsibility and other partner organizations are convening a conference for leaders concerned about the effects of climate change. "Climate Health Summit: Creating Health Leaders on Climate Change,” which will be held September 20-21, 2015, in Washington, DC, will provide health professional training on the health threats of climate change and best practices to achieve the health benefits of climate solutions. The training will cover the health impacts of climate change, the immediate health benefits of reducing the use of fossil fuels, communication skills and the climate solutions that can be advanced immediately in states and communities. The event will include a day to educate legislators on Capitol Hill on health climate solutions and the urgent need for them.

Join experts on climate change, communications and climate solutions. Find out more about the Climate Health Summit here. Registration and Housing are open now. Space is limited.
 Register early and save!


16
.
HEALTHY OUTLOOK: PUBLIC HEALTH RESOURCES ON HEALTH SYSTEMS TRANSFORMATION

The American Public Health Association has released a toolkit that includes a series of fact sheets, issue briefs and other resources about health systems transformation. Healthy Outlook: Public Health Resources on Health Systems Transformation is designed to highlight policies in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the implications they have on public health and identify opportunities that promote active engagement of public health in health systems transformation.


17
.
AAMC SEEKING TESTIMONIALS TO PROMOTE PREVENTIVE MEDICINE TO MEDICAL STUDENTS

ACPM is seeking short testimonials (2-3 sentences) about practicing preventive medicine and/or occupational medicine, and why physicians chose to practice these specialties, for submission to the Association of American Medical Colleges’ (AAMC) Careers in Medicine Specialty Choice series. A photo of the physician in action or their practice would be a nice accompaniment to the testimonial, but not compulsory. Alternatively, any previously prepared blog posts or video clips geared toward medical students would also be welcome. Please submit any testimonials, photos and/or links to content by Friday, August 7, to Jessica Bradshaw at jbradshaw@acpm.org.


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