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ACPM Headlines 7/22/13
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In this Issue

Top Stories

1. ACPM/ACOEM co-sponsor congressional briefing

2. ACPM receives CDC grant to advance PH/PC integration efforts

3. Men still want PSA testing despite USPSTF recommendations

ACPM News

4. ACPM surveys PMR program directors to assist with funding efforts

5. ACPM participates in "Public Health 101” congressional briefing

6. ACPM featured in "Primary Care-Public Health Collaborative Highlights”

7. Fellowship applications being accepted for September deadline

Policy and Practice

8. Sen approps committee bill brings double dose of good news

9. From the USPSTF: ASA use for primary prevention of CV events

10. Commissioned Corps first uniformed service to prohibit tobacco use

Research and Reports

11. Prescription painkiller overdoses rising rapidly

12. Youth homicide reaches 30-year low

13. IOM report calls for quality measurement for population health

Announcements

14. Cancer Control Career Develop. Awards for Primary Care Physicians

15. EIS program now accepting applications

Top Stories

1. ACPM AND ACOEM COSPONSOR CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING

ACPM and the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM) cosponsored a standing-room-only congressional briefing on modernizing the cost analysis methods employed by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) when scoring legislation that promotes clinical or community-based preventive services. ACPM member Ron Joines, MD, MPH, ACOEM president Ron Loeppke, MD, MPH, and ACOEM president-elect Kathryn Mueller, MD, MPH, were among the participants on a special panel discussion that sought to identify opportunities to capture long-term cost savings that result from prevention policies and interventions.

Currently, CBO is limited to a 10-year window when identifying the cost or savings of specific bills. Under legislation recently introduced by Rep. Michael Burgess (R-TX) and Donna Christensen (D-VI), "The Preventive Health Savings Act” (HR 2663), CBO would be given the flexibility to expand its scoring window to 20 years when working to analyze the cost of prevention-focused policy.

At the briefing, Dr. Joines noted that "Promoting health in the workplace should be considered a fundamental part of an overall national health strategy based in preventive medicine. Through events such as our Congressional briefing, designed to raise awareness of the impact of preventive medicine, we hope our national leaders will continue to move in this important policy direction.”

Other speakers included Rep. Michael Burgess (R-TX) and Linda Bilheimer, PhD, CBO assistant director for health. For more information please email Paul Bonta.


2. ACPM RECEIVES CDC GRANT TO ADVANCE PUBLIC HEALTH/PRIMARY CARE INTEGRATION EFFORTS

ACPM has received a five-year cooperative agreement from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention for "Building Capacity of the Public Health System to Improve Population Health through National Organizations.” ACPM was one of only 23 national, non-profit organizations to receive one of these competitive, partner awards and one of only two medical specialty societies selected.

Under this cooperative agreement, ACPM will spend the next five years focusing on population health capacity-building projects for preventive medicine and primary care physicians. The first project will develop educational opportunities for physicians and residents to advance the Million Hearts Initiative, foster collaboration between local health departments and primary care, and facilitate physician adoption and mastery of population health concepts, skills, and practices. The umbrella award will allow ACPM to compete within a small pool of national organizations for multiple other awards and projects that will support population health capacity building across the health system.

For more information, please contact Andrea Lowe, ACPM’s Policy and Practice Manager.


3. MEN STILL WANT PSA TESTING DESPITE USPSTF RECOMMENDATIONS

According to a recent study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine (AJPM), most men plan to continue getting PSA tests despite the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force’s (USPSTF) recommendation against screening, although just over one-third of men report shared decision making for screening with their physicians.

The study was conducted approximately one month after the USPSTF released its recommendation in October 2011, surveying 1,089 men 40 to 74 years of age who did not have a history of prostate cancer for their initial response to the recommendation. The authors found most participants (61%) agreed with the new PSA testing recommendation and were confident that the recommendation was based on the latest research (69%). However, only 13% intended to follow task force recommendations and forego a PSA test. More than half of men (54%) surveyed still plan to get a PSA test in the future, and one-third of participants were undecided.


ACPM News

4. ACPM SURVEYS PMR PROGRAM DIRECTORS TO ASSIST WITH FUNDING EFFORTS

To help sharpen ACPM advocacy efforts aimed at securing a dedicated and stable federal funding stream for all Preventive Medicine residency training programs, ACPM has released a survey for residency program directors to request financial and programmatic-specific information regarding their training programs. In addition, ACPM has partnered with the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) on select survey questions addressing partnerships between Preventive Medicine residency programs and local, state, and tribal health departments.

All 73 accredited programs have been contacted directly regarding this survey; however, if you are a program director and have not received any information about this survey, please contact Andrea Lowe, ACPM’s Policy and Practice Manager.


5. ACPM PARTICIPATES IN "PUBLIC HEALTH 101” CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING

ACPM member and chair of its Business Development Committee Ryung Suh, MD, MPH, FACPM, represented ACPM at a "Public Health 101” congressional briefing where he discussed the intersection of public health and military readiness, education, public safety and industry. The briefing was organized by the Coalition for Health Funding, a coalition of over 80 national organizations that have joined together to preserve and strengthen federal investments in public health.

Dr. Suh stated that, "public health is intractably linked to military readiness as the military is facing a serious challenge enlisting soldiers who can meet the rigors and demands of military training due to their poor health. Obesity has quickly emerged as a serious threat facing military readiness and the military is responding by designing and implementing proven public health approaches to improve health.” Dr. Suh also noted that more funding is needed to strengthen federal investments in public health programs.

For more information please email Paul Bonta.


6. ACPM FEATURED IN "PRIMARY CARE-PUBLIC HEALTH COLLABORATIVE HIGHLIGHTS”

As co-chair of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO)-supported Primary Care and Public Health Integration Initiative Value Proposition Committee, ACPM was featured as a partner organization in this month’s Primary Care and Public Health Collaborative Highlights newsletter. The newsletter is a new biweekly publication by the ASTHO-supported initiative to inform stakeholders about committee meetings, conferences and presentations, success stories from communities putting integration to work, and resources for partners.

If you are interested in joining this initiative, please contact Andrea Lowe, ACPM Policy and Practice Manager, at alowe@acpm.org.


7. FELLOWSHIP APPLICATIONS CURRENTLY BEING ACCEPTED FOR OCTOBER 2013 DEADLINE

Interested in becoming an ACPM Fellow? The ACPM Membership Committee is currently accepting applications for consideration at its fall meeting through September 20, 2013 at 5:00 PM (ET). Fellows are elected by the College’s Membership Committee after thorough review and consideration of candidate applications. Complete applications will include a fellowship points form (used to outline your experience, volunteerism, etc.), supporting materials that serve as documentation of the achievements outlined on your points form, and the non-refundable $50 application fee. Candidates will be notified concerning results of the membership committee’s deliberation in early-October. To view a list of recently elected Fellows, and obtain additional information about the application process, visit our website.


Policy and Practice

8. SENATE APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEE BILL BRINGS DOUBLE DOSE OF GOOD NEWS

The Senate Appropriations Committee approved its FY 2014 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations bill that includes increased funding for two of ACPM’s policy priorities: enhanced support for preventive medicine residency (PMR) training programs and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS).

Under the bill, funding for PMR training programs will increase from $3.5 million to $3.8 million while funding for the NVDRS program will receive a boost of $15 million to facilitate nationwide expansion of the state-based violent death surveillance program. Also, the committee maintains funding for the integrative medicine in preventive medicine initiative that currently provides support to 12 PMR training programs.

Note that all funding levels included in the committee’s bill ignore the impact of sequestration, making it is unlikely that any final FY 2014 budget agreement will mirror the funding levels noted in this bill. Additionally, House appropriators have vowed to draft their FY 2014 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations bill at a level that falls $42.5 billion below the Senate bill. So while the FY 2014 appropriations process remains highly fluid, ACPM priorities are well positioned considering the dire fiscal challenges at the federal level. For more information, please contact Paul Bonta.


9. FROM THE USPSTF: ASPIRIN USE FOR PRIMARY PREVENTION OF CV EVENTS

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has posted for public comment a draft research plan concerning aspirin use for primary prevention of cardiovascular events. The final research plan will guide the research used to update the 2009 recommendation.

The draft research plan will be open for public comments from July 11 until August 7, 2013. The draft methodology and key questions are included in the comment form.


10. COMMISSIONED CORPS IS FIRST UNIFORMED SERVICE TO PROHIBIT TOBACCO USE

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Assistant Secretary for Health, Howard Koh, MD, MPH, has issued new instructions regarding tobacco use in the Uniform and Appearance Policy for U.S. Public Health Service Officers. Effective January 2014, all active duty officers will be prohibited from using tobacco or tobacco products while in uniform.

This order makes the U.S. Public Health Service the first uniformed service to prohibit smoking while in uniform. The announcement and prohibition was timed to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the first Surgeon General report on tobacco use, "Smoking and Health: Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service.”


Research and Reports

11. PRESCRIPTION PAINKILLER OVERDOSES INCREASING AT ALARMING RATE

A new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows an alarming rise in prescription painkiller overdoses, especially among women, since the turn of the century. The report notes a 5-fold increase in death due to painkiller overdose among women while the increase among men was 3.5-fold. There were 6,600 painkiller deaths among women in 2010 and nearly 48,000 since 1999.

The study revealed that an average of 42 women died daily from all types of drug overdose in 2010. Of these, 18 deaths were from prescription painkillers. Additionally, drug overdoses have killed more women in the US since 2007 than motor vehicle accidents.

For ACPM’s 2012 webinar on the topic, visit http://www.acpm.org/?page=OpioidsWebinar.


12. YOUTH HOMICIDE REACHES 30-YEAR LOW

The homicide rate for youth ages 10 to 24 in the U.S. reached a 30-year low in 2010, according to a new CDC report released last week, though the decline has slowed in recent years, particularly for groups at high-risk for violence. Even with the progress that has been made, homicide ranks in the top three leading causes of death for young Americans in this age group, resulting in an estimated $9 billion in lost productivity and medical costs each year.

During the period 2000–2010, rates declined for all groups, although the decline was significantly slower for males compared with females and for blacks compared with Hispanics and persons of other racial/ethnic groups. Also, the decline for firearm homicides from 2000 to 2010 was significantly slower than for non-firearm homicides.

These findings highlight the need for increased use of youth violence prevention strategies and continued work to stop youth violence before it first occurs. Primary prevention strategies for schools, families, and neighborhoods remain critical, particularly approaches that engage high-risk youth.


13. IOM REPORT CALLS FOR QUALITY MEASUREMENT FOR POPULATION HEALTH

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has released a consensus report, "Toward Quality Measures for Population Health and the Leading Health Indicators.” The report examines using quality measures to identify progress toward the Leading Health Indicators identified in Healthy People 2020. IOM Committee members strongly support the use of quality measures in public health and multi-sectorial health systems and provide recommendations for communities selecting quality measures for their programs.


Announcements

14. CANCER CONTROL CAREER DEVELOPMENT AWARDS FOR PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIANS

The American Cancer Society has announced the 2014 Cancer Control Career Development Award for Primary Care Physicians (CCCDA). The purpose of this award is to encourage and assist primary care physicians who will pursue academic careers with an emphasis on cancer control. Through the CCCDA, the Society seeks to provide opportunities for promising individuals to acquire and enhance knowledge and skills in primary care practice, education, and research activities related to cancer control. Awards are for three years and for up to $100,000 per year. A maximum of $10,000 per year for the mentor(s) may be included in the budget.

An informational call about the award application process is scheduled for July 26 at 4pm. For more information about the CCCDA—including instructions to join the call—please visit the ACS website. Select "Explore Research” > "Apply for a Research Grant” > "Grant Types”. The deadline to apply is October 15, 2013.


15. CDC EIS PROGRAM NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) program is now accepting applications for the July 2014 entry class. The EIS is a unique two year, post-graduate applied epidemiology training program, which has trained more than 3,000 EIS officers since 1951. EIS Officers, often called CDC's "disease detectives," have held national and international leadership positions at CDC and other public health agencies. The experience is extremely useful for health professionals who desire to gain skills in caring for populations—particularly important in this era of accountability and health reform. Physicians, doctoral-level scientists, veterinarians and other medical professionals are eligible to apply. More information about the EIS is available at the CDC EIS website. The deadline for applications is September 1, 2013.


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