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ACPM Headlines 7/20/12
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In This Issue:

Top Stories

1. Interactive health records may boost preventive care

2. ACPM supports effort to avert further discretionary spending cuts

ACPM News

3. Register for ACPM’s BRC 2012! Hotel deadline approaching!

4. Fellowship applications currently accepted for Oct. ‘12 deadline

5. Young Physician Section to host ACPM member webinar

Policy and Practice

6. ACPM expresses opposition to exemption of cigars from FDA’s authority

7. Preventive medicine caucus question AMA commitment to public health

8. Fund says U.S. women at a disadvantage with insurance coverage

Research and Reports

9. Antiretroviral drugs reduce likelihood of HIV for high risk groups

10. Population shifts and implications for walking

11. Coffee consumption linked to reduced heart failure and skin cancer

Announcements

12. Johns Hopkins announces new Center for Population Health IT

13. Members in the News: Last, Fielding


Top Stories

1. INTERACTIVE HEALTH RECORDS MAY BOOST PREVENTIVE CARE

Users of interactive preventive health records (IPHRs) were almost twice as likely to be up-to-date on all preventive services compared with nonusers, especially in the areas of screening tests and immunizations, according to a recent study published in the July issue of Annals of Family Medicine. IPHRs link patients to their clinician's record, explain information in lay language, display tailored recommendations and educational resources, and generate reminders. The study was led by ACPM members Alex H. Krist, MD, MPH and Steven H. Woolf, MD, MPH, FACPM.

The study findings showed that 60 percent of the patients using the IPHR were called by their clinicians because the IPHR identified them as being overdue for a preventive service (e.g., cholesterol test or vaccine), having an uncontrolled chronic condition, or needing to improve a health behavior. Researchers recommend that attention is needed to ensure future personal health records can deliver higher levels of functionality, similar to the IPHR, and that a greater number of patients and clinicians actively use the systems.

A new handbook from AHRQ, also authored by Drs. Krist and Woolf, offers practical guidance on the implementation of IPHRs. An Interactive Preventive Care Record: A Handbook for Using Patient-Centered Personal Health Records to Promote Prevention provides practical steps for healthcare professionals to follow when integrating IPHRs as components of electronic health records.

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2. ACPM SUPPORTS EFFORT TO AVERT FURTHER DISCRETIONARY CUTS

ACPM joined nearly 3,000 national, state, and local organizations in a sign-on letter to Congress urging that they avert sequestration by "adopting a balanced approach to deficit reduction that does not include further cuts to NDD (non-defense discretionary) programs.”

The letter states, "America’s day-to-day security requires more than military might. NDD programs support our economy, drive our global competitiveness, and provide an environment where all Americans may lead healthy, productive lives. Only a balanced approach to deficit reduction can restore fiscal stability, and NDD has done its part. Please work together to find a balanced approach to deficit reduction that does not include further cuts to NDD programs.”

The letter, organized by the Coalition for Health Funding (of which the ACPM is a member) and the Committee on Education Funding, is signed by organizations representing the health, education, law enforcement, science, housing, workforce, transportation, and faith communities, among others.”

To view a copy of the letter, visit http://bit.ly/OzLI0A.

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ACPM News

3. REGISTER NOW FOR ACPM’S BOARD REVIEW COURSE

The 25th Annual Preventive Medicine Board Review Course, scheduled August 18-22, 2012, at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC, is rapidly approaching so don’t miss your chance to register for this once-a-year educational opportunity. Whether preparing for your Boards, maintaining your specialty certification, or simply refreshing yourself on the core tenets of Preventive Medicine, the course offers the only comprehensive review of the specialty. You may register for the full five-day course, the two-day weekend refresher, or for a specialty breakout only. Nearly 40 CME and MOC credits will be offered!

After registering for the 25th Annual Board Review Course, please make your hotel reservations at the Omni Shoreham Hotel, the official meeting hotel. Conveniently located in the heart of Washington, DC, the Omni Shoreham is offering a special group rate of $169 (plus applicable taxes) for course attendees.

Make your hotel reservations today, as special offer rates are valid only through Friday, July 27th. To make a reservation please call 202-234-0700 and mention "ACPM” to get the discounted rate. For more information about the course and registration, please visit our website.

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4. FELLOWSHIP APPLICATIONS CURRENTLY ACCEPTED FOR OCTOBER 2012 DEADLINE

Interested in becoming an ACPM Fellow? The ACPM Membership Committee currently is accepting applications for consideration now through October 19, 2012 at 5:00 PM (ET). This will be the final opportunity to apply for fellowship in 2012.

Fellows are elected by the College’s Membership Committee after thorough review and consideration of candidate applications. Complete applications will include a fellowship points form (used to outline credentials, experience, volunteerism, etc.), documentation to support the achievements outlined on your points form, and the non-refundable $50 application fee. Candidates will be notified concerning results of the membership committee’s deliberation in mid-November. Visit http://bit.ly/N0Tpi0 for more information, or to submit your application and supporting materials.

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5
. YOUNG PHYSICIAN SECTION TO HOST ACPM FELLOWSHIP DEVELOPMENT WEBINAR

Join your colleagues on August 8 at 9 pm EDT for a Young Physician Section (YPS)-sponsored webinar titled, "Joining the Best of the Best: How to Become a Fellow of the American College of Preventive Medicine." David Shih, MD, MS, FACPM, Chair-Elect of the American College of Preventive Medicine’s (ACPM) YPS, will lead the webinar, which will focus on applying for fellowship in the College.Dr. Shih is a medical officer and epidemiology team leader at the Food and Drug Administration.

After a 25-minute presentation there will be 10-15 minutes of Q/A with Dr. Shih and ACPM membership manager, Camille Sanders. This presentation is part of the ACPM YPS webinar series. YPS membership is open to all ACPM members under the age of 40 or within 8 years of residency completion. The YPS webinar is free, but registration is required. To reserve your space now, please visit https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/622761238.

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Policy and Practice

6. ACPM OPPOSES EXEMPTION OF CIGARS FROM FDA’S AUTHORITY

ACPM joined with its medical and public health partner organizations on a sign-on letter to the House of Representatives "to express our strong support for the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) oversight over tobacco products and to share with you our organizations’ deep concern that amendments that weaken the FDA’s authority over tobacco products may be offered to the Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration and Related Agencies” FY 2013 appropriations bill.

Cigar manufacturers have been advocating for an exemption from FDA’s authority claiming the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act limited FDA’s authority to cigarettes only. ACPM has been a staunch proponent of FDA’s authority over all tobacco products and will continue to oppose efforts that seek to limit or weaken FDA’s oversight capabilities. To view a copy of the letter, visit http://bit.ly/Prz5se.

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7
. PREVENTIVE MEDICINE CAUCUS URGES AMA COMMITMENT TO PUBLIC HEALTH

The American Medical Association (AMA) Section Council on Preventive Medicine (SCPM), which recently met during the AMA annual House of Delegates (HoD) meeting, sent a letter to AMA Board Chair Steven Stack, MD urging that the AMA maintain its commitment to public health. The letter was sent in response to the release of a new AMA strategic plan that does not provide explicit support for public health. Rather, the strategic plan is driven by the following three pillars that will define the AMA organizational structure and future activities: improving health outcomes, accelerating change in medical education, and enhancing physician satisfaction.

The letter, signed by Glenn Merchant, MD, MPH, FACPM, chair of the SCPM, noted that members of SCPM are "particularly interested in learning more about your focus on improving health outcomes as we feel this presents a unique opportunity to promote the practice of population-based medicine. While physicians play an important role in improving the health outcomes of their patients, they also play a vital role in improving the health of their communities. Measuring health outcomes at the population level drives improvements in both public health and clinical medicine. Employers, insurers, state governments and others focus their efforts at the population level because they understand that yields the greatest impact. The AMA must recognize the effectiveness of population-based health outcomes by developing measures that extend beyond the clinical environment.”

To view a copy of the letter, visit bit.ly/LyfCkz.

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8. FUND SAYS U.S. WOMEN AT A DISADVANTAGE WITH INSURANCE COVERAGE

A new report by The Commonwealth Fund found that women in the U.S.—both with and without health insurance—are more likely to go without needed health care because of cost and have greater difficulty paying their medical bills than women in 10 other industrialized countries. The report found an estimated 18.7 million U.S. women ages 19 to 64 were uninsured in 2010, up from 12.8 million in 2000. An additional 16.7 million women had health insurance but had such high out-of-pocket costs relative to their income that they were effectively underinsured in 2010.

"Forty-three percent of women in the U.S. reported they went without recommended care, did not see a doctor when sick, or failed to fill prescriptions because of costs in the past year,” noted the report. To view a copy of the report, visit http://bit.ly/MovlmX.

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Research and Reports

9. FDA APPROVES ANTIRETROVIRAL DRUG FOR HIV PREVENTION

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Truvada (emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) as the first drug to reduce the risk of HIV infection in people who are at high risk of HIV infection and who may engage in sexual activity with HIV-infected partners. Truvada was previously approved in 2004 in combination with other antiretroviral agents for the treatment of HIV-infected adults and children 12 years or older.

The approval calls for Truvada to be taken daily for pre-exposure prevention in combination with safe sex practices, such as wearing condoms. As a part of the approval, FDA is strengthening Truvada’s warning label to alert health care professionals and uninfected individuals that Truvada must only be used by people confirmed to be HIV-negative before the drug is prescribed, and must be re-tested at least every three months during use. The most common side effects of Truvada include diarrhea, nausea, abdominal pain, headache, and weight loss.

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10. POPULATION SHIFTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR WALKING

A recent report from researchers at Hunter College indicates that major shifts in the United States population could lead to significant increases in both recreational and utilitarian walking, according to America Walks, a national nonprofit organization. The authors of the report suggest that three demographic changes will lead to a "walking revolution.” First, baby boomers, who represent a quarter of the US population, will increasingly turn to walking for exercise as they age, and aging baby-boomers also are choosing to live in walkable communities. Second, members of Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1999, have different transportation priorities and are less likely to be drivers than other generations. Third, the decline of suburbs and rejuvenation of downtown areas will contribute to a rise in the popularity of walking. View the full article at http://bit.ly/M2Zg4Q.

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11. COFFEE CONSUMPTION LINKED TO REDUCED HEART FAILURE AND SKIN CANCER

Two recent studies indicate that moderate coffee consumption is associated with reduced risk of heart failure as well as skin cancer. One study found that consuming about two eight-ounce cups of coffee reduced the risk of heart failure risk up to an estimated 11 percent. However, the most benefit was seen at this moderate level of consumption, and these benefits gradually decreased with higher levels of coffee consumption, reaching no benefit at a level of about five daily cups.

The second study showed that women and men who drank at least three cups of coffee a day had up to a 20 percent lower risk of developing basal cell carcinoma (BCC) than non-coffee drinkers. While decaffeinated coffee consumption was not associated with a similar decrease in BCC risk, caffeine consumption from other dietary sources such as cola, tea, and chocolate also appeared to decrease risk of basal cell carcinoma. Read more at http://hvrd.me/NIeY3S.

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Announcements

12. JOHNS HOPKINS ANNOUNCES NEW CENTER FOR POPULATION HEALTH I.T.

Johns Hopkins University has announced the establishment of a new interdisciplinary center, the Center for Population Health Information Technology (CPHIT), focused on population centric health IT research and development. The center will aim to improve and expand the use of electronic health record systems, e-health and information technology. Though CPHIT will be based within the Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Department of Health, Policy and Management, the center will involve a collaboration with faculty from the School of Medicine, Whiting School of Engineering, Carey Business School at Johns Hopkins University, and the Johns Hopkins Health System.

Learn more at http://bit.ly/NLoJ3e.

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13. MEMBERS IN THE NEWS: LAST, FIELDING

  • ACPM Fellow and Past President (1987-1989) John M Last, MD, FACPM has been admitted as an Officer in the Order of Canada, in recognition of his contributions to public health, preventive medicine and epidemiology.
  • The Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) has named ACPM Fellow and Past President (1997-1999) Jonathan E. Fielding, MD, MPH, MBA, FACPM, Los Angeles County’s Director of Public Health, as its 2012 Honorary Fellow. At a national level, he has served as a founding member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, chair of the U.S. Community Preventive Services Task Force, and chair of the Advisory Committee on the 2020 Health Objectives for the Nation. He is one of 13 founding members of the nation’s Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health. He is the author of more than 150 original scientific articles and chapters and editor of the Annual Review of Public Health.

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