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ACPM Headlines 7/2/13
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In this Issue

Top Stories

1. ACPM Board adopts framework for program certification

2. ACPM advances policy at the AMA HOD

ACPM News

3. ACPM participates in Animal-Human Health briefing

4. Membership Committee approves new Fellows

5. Get involved with ACPM business development!

6. Section Highlight: ACPM Resident Physician Section

Policy and Practice

7. Updates from the USPSTF

8. Community Guide update

Research and Reports

9. Fast food chains respond to menu labeling with healthier options

10. Adult smoking rates again on the decline

11. Study shows health insurance has significant impact on health

Announcements

12. Corporate Roundtable members in the news

13. ACPM donors making a difference


Top Stories

1. ACPM BOARD ADOPTS FRAMEWORK FOR PROGRAM CERTIFICATION

The ACPM Board of Regents at its recent summer teleconference approved a framework for establishing an ACPM certification program for external products and services. Developed by an ACPM Board task force led by Midwest Regent Chris Sullivan, the framework establishes a procedure by which the College can evaluate programs, products and services to determine if ACPM should provide a level of "certification” as well as what such certification means. Certification will be reserved for programs, products, or services—not for health professionals or corporate organizations—in the prevention and wellness market, similar to programs of the American Dental Association or American Heart Association who provide their seal of approval for products meeting testing or evaluation standards set by their associations.

The centerpiece of the framework adopted by the Board is a three-part review process, which includes a business value review, a scientific evidence review, and a conflict, risk and transparency review. These reviews will be conducted by existing ACPM committees—the Business Development subcommittee, the Prevention Practice Committee, and the Committee on Ethics, respectively. Programs or products that submit applications through an ACPM certification web site and pass these reviews will be referred to ACPM’s Executive Committee for final approval.

Also at its meeting the Board of Regents supported an ACPM fundraising plan with three distinct campaigns, reviewed ACPM finances and approved another clean audit for 2012, and worked toward consensus on a variety of documents and recommendations to advance an overhaul of ACPM’s Board and governance structures. Once approved by the Board later this summer, the governance recommendations will be circulated to the ACPM membership for input.

For more information on the Board’s actions or any of these initiatives, contact ACPM executive director Mike Barry at mbarry@acpm.org.


2. ACPM ADVANCES POLICY AT AMA IN SUPPORT OF CDC VIOLENT DEATH SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM

The AMA House of Delegates (HoD) at its annual meeting in Chicago adopted an ACPM-sponsored policy resolution asking the AMA to support the President’s call to expand the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) to all 50 states. NVDRS is a violent death surveillance program administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Injury Prevention and Control that assists public health officials better understand the circumstances that lead to violent deaths in their communities.

ACPM delegate Robert Gilchick, MD, MPH, FACPM, led the successful adoption of the ACPM resolution with support from ACPM alternate-delegate Jason Spangler, MD, MPM, FACPM,and ACPM representative to the AMA Section Council on Preventive Medicine Wendy Braund, MD, MPH. Dr. Gilchick also was quoted in an article by Forbes on the controversial move by the AMA HoD to classify obesity as a disease.


ACPM News

3. ACPM PARTICIPATES IN CAPITOL HILL BRIEFINGS

ACPM President Halley Faust, MD, MPH, MA, FACPM and member Clarence Lam, MD, MPH, participated in separate congressional briefings on the link between human and animal health and the need to expand injury and violence prevention activities, respectively. ACPM joined with the Animal Health Institute (AHI) and the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) in sponsoring the "Human-Animal Medicine: Communicating Across the Species Divide” briefing, where Dr. Faust highlighted how Preventive Medicine specialists are uniquely qualified to communicate and practice with and across various disciplines on efforts to further promote the link between human and animal health.

Additionally, ACPM joined with the Injury and Violence Prevention Network (IVPN) in sponsoring the "Violence Prevention throughout the Lifespan” briefing, where Dr. Lam described the importance of violence counseling in the medical setting and the role of clinical preventive medicine in violence prevention activities. The briefing sought to highlight the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Injury Prevention and Control programs and research. For more information, please email Paul Bonta.

4. MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE APPROVES NEW FELLOWS

Following a thorough review of applications and supporting documentation, ACPM’s Membership Committee at its recent meeting approved five members to become Fellows of the American College of Preventive Medicine (FACPM). New Fellows (in alphabetical order, by last name) include:

Sheryl Bedno, MD, MPH, MS, FACPM
Peter Matos, DO, MPH, MS, FACPM
Alice Mills, MD, MPH, FACPM
Catherine Witkop, MD, MPH, FACPM, LT COL, USAF, MC
Amir Wolfe, MD, MPH, MBA, FACPM.

ACPM extends congratulations to all of our new Fellows! New Fellows will be formally recognized at the Preventive Medicine 2014 banquet in New Orleans, LA.

Applications and supporting documentation for 2013 Fellowship consideration currently are being accepted until September 20. For additional information about how to become an ACPM Fellow or to submit your application, please visit our website.


5. GET INVOLVED WITH ACPM BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EFFORTS - VOLUNTEER TODAY! 

Interested in getting involved with ACPM business development initiatives? The College is working on a variety of exciting initiatives and revenue-generating business models and could use volunteers to lend expertise and contribute time to these goals. Help is needed in developing business models/plans, conducting market analyses, determining price points for products, identifying corporate supporters for Preventive Medicine 2014 and other ACPM initiatives, and working with the ACPM Corporate Roundtable.

If you have good business acumen, entrepreneurial spirit, or simply time to lend to outreach efforts, ACPM would value your contributions to its Business Development Committee. For more information or to volunteer, please contact Maureen Simmons, MA, CFRE, ACPM Chief Development Officer, by email or 505-220-0605.


6. SECTION HIGHLIGHT: ACPM RESIDENT PHYSICIAN SECTION

The ACPM Resident Physician Section(RPS) serves as the national voice of preventive medicine residents on issues affecting specialty training, policy, and education. The College provides RPS members with educational resources and offers a forum for networking with many of the most innovative and experienced leaders in preventive medicine and public health. RPS members receive full ACPM member benefits, including a subscription to the American Journal of Preventive Medicine (AJPM), and discounts on publications and event registration. RPS members may vote and hold office in section elections.

The Section also hosts an annual Residency Fair and Section Mixer in conjunction with ACPM’s Preventive Medicine meeting to educate medical students and non-preventive medicine residents about available residency opportunities and to facilitate networking.

Resident members who are involved report that RPS membership serves as a gateway torewarding, professional experiences and networking opportunities.

To learn more about RPS, and how you may become involved, visit our website.


Policy and Practice

7. UPDATES FROM THE USPSTF

The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has released two final recommendations for clinician intervention and screening. Information and links to each of these publications are noted below. Additional USPSTF products, such as draft and final research plans and opportunities for public comment, can be found at the USPSTF website.

  • Final Recommendation: Screening for Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Adults. This recommendation received a "B” rating (high certainty of a net moderate benefit or moderate certainty of a moderate to substantial benefit) for adult screening in high risk individuals, as well as offering a one-time screening for adults born between 1945 and 1965.
  • Final Recommendation: Primary Care Interventions to Prevent Child Maltreatment. This recommendation received an "I” statement (current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms) for primary care interventions among children who do not have signs or symptoms of maltreatment.


8. COMMUNITY GUIDE UPDATE

The Community Preventive Services Task Force, an independent panel of public health and prevention experts that analyzes evidence of effectiveness of community-based interventions, has released its 2013 Annual Report to Congress. The report, which focuses on cardiovascular disease (CVD), provides recommendations for prevention and management of CVD while calling attention to gaps in the current evidence base. Also, the report identifies opportunities and accomplishments that have occurred since the previous report released in 2012.

In addition, the Community Preventive Services Task Force has announced the following evidence-based recommendations on tobacco use: Increasing the Unit Price of Tobacco Products, Mass-Reach Health Communication Interventions, and Smoke-Free Policies.

Please visit the Community Preventive Services Task Force website for more information.


Research and Reports

9. FAST FOOD CHAINS RESPOND TO MENU-LABELING LEGISLATION WITH HEALTHIER OPTIONS

Following the introduction of labeling regulations, fast-food chains that were required to post calories increased the proportion of healthier entrées, according to a study published in the CDC journal Preventing Chronic Disease by the Drexel University School of Public Health. The study, which explored the impact of menu labeling on fast-food menu offerings before and after calorie labeling regulations were first implemented in 2008, found that fast-food chains increased the proportion of healthier options from 13% before 2008 to 20% between 2008 and 2011. This was a statistically significant change relative to chains that did not post calories.

Across all menus, the average calories for an a la carte entrée remained at 450 kcal throughout the study period. These findings suggest that menu labeling has thus far not affected the average nutritional content of fast-food menu items, but it may motivate restaurants to slightly increase the availability of healthier options.


10. ADULT SMOKING RATE AGAIN ON THE DECLINE

The percentage of adult smokers is declining again following a long period in which rates plateaued, according to a recent analysis of 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data. After hovering at 20-21% for seven years, the adult smoking rate dipped to 19% in 2010 and 2011 and dropped to 18% in 2012. Data is not yet available for adolescents.

The report did not provide reasons for the decline. However, in 2012 the CDC launched its highly successful Tips from Former Smokers campaign. In addition, smoke-free laws continue to be enacted across the country with 1 state (Indiana) and 58 municipalities passing such laws last year.


11. INSURANCE COVERAGE INCREASES ACCESS TO CARE, BUT IMPACT ON HEALTH IMPROVEMENT UNCERTAIN

A recent study published in the The New England Journal of Medicine reported that people who gained insurance coverage through Oregon’s Medicaid program experienced better access to care, increased detection of depression and diabetes, and reduced out-of-pocket costs. Yet blood pressure control, cholesterol levels, and blood sugar levels did not significantly improve. While some have said these findings suggest insurance coverage may not lead to better health,a new post on The Commonwealth Fund Blog arguesthat previous research leaves little doubt that insurance has a beneficial effect on health status over time.

Commonwealth Fund president David Blumenthal, MD, and vice president for Affordable Health Insurance Sara R. Collins, PhD,point out that the study examined the effects of just 17 months of coverage, on average.Moreover, the benefits of health insurance may manifest in bettertrends in health status, rather than absolute improvements. Adults examined in the Oregon study may also have been too healthy, and the number of outcome measures may have been too small, to discern immediate health effects from gaining coverage.

Announcements

12. CORPORATE ROUNDTABLE MEMBERS IN THE NEWS: EHE INTERNATIONAL 

EHE International, a nationally recognized leader in preventive medicine and annual physical exams, has been naming preventive care centers around the country to join its network of EHE-certified preventive care centers designed to help patients proactively maintain their health. EHE International, which is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year, is an ACPM Corporate Roundtable charter member and recently upgraded to Silver Level membership in 2013. Thank you EHE International for all you do to support ACPM and preventive medicine!


13. ACPM DONOR SPOTLIGHTt: MARY APPLEGATE, MD, MPH

ACPM is working on multiple fundraising campaigns to strengthen its ability to achieve its ambitious strategic goals and to support the development of young preventive medicine physicians and future ACPM leaders. ACPM Headlines periodically will feature short interviews with various ACPM donors. To learn more about ACPM’s fundraising campaigns and to contribute, visit http://www.acpm.org/donations/.

Dr. Applegate has been a public health physician in Albany, New York, for the past 20 years, first at the New York State Department of Health, and in recent years at the University of Albany School of Public Health. A former Northeast Regent, Dr. Applegate has been a supporter of ACPM since shortly after graduating from her preventive medicine residency.

Why I feel it is important to donate to charity: We live in a country that is averse – almost allergic – to paying taxes to promote the common good. Those of us with sufficient resources have an obligation to support organizations that work hard every day to improve life for our fellow citizens.

Most fulfilling aspect of donating to ACPM: I know that every contribution I make to ACPM makes a real difference in what the organization can do; it doesn’t just disappear like a drop in the ocean.

How I hope my donations have helped others: Our field is medicine’s best kept secret. When we are most successful, we are most invisible. We need to work together through ACPM to get the word out to our fellow physicians, to medical students, and to policy makers. In current discussions about health care reform, there is a lot of talk about preventive medicine, but no resources for training specialists in preventive medicine and very little attention to the population level changes that are needed to make prevention work.

What I’ve learned through my involvement with ACPM: The preventive medicine community is small compared with other specialties in medicine. Through ACPM, it’s easy to get involved in high-level, national efforts to promote our specialty and to promote the public’s health.

Something about me not everyone knows: I’ve been dealing with some serious non-preventable health problems in recent years, which has given me a whole new appreciation for the importance of good underlying health. We can never prevent all harms, but by being in good health to begin with, we can recover more easily when we get a bad blow. Prevention is important for all of us!


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