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ACPM Headlines 6/3/11
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In This Issue:

Top Stories

  1. Food pyramid about to be replaced with food plate symbol

  2. 30 Years of HIV/AIDS

  3. Cell phones may cause cancer, advisory panel says

ACPM News

  1. Betsey Tilson speaks at Capitol Hill briefing

  2. Rob Gilchick new chair of ACPM Policy Committee

  3. AJPM Behavioral Informatics Press Event archive

Policy and Practice

  1. Highest number of measles cases reported in 15 years

  2. The Healthier Generation Benefit to address childhood obesity

  3. House Appropriations Committee approves subcommittee allocations

  4. ACPM signs letter to President on reconsideration of ozone health standards

Research and Reports

  1. Study on Teen Use of No- or Low-Cost HIV Tests

  2. Child and Adolescent Health and Health Care Quality: Measuring What Matters

  3. New AHRQ Guide helps prevent ulcers in hospitals

  4. WHO releases publication: Persistent Organic Pollutants - Impact on Children

Announcements

  1. Call for proposals: Art and Science of Health Promotion conference


Top Stories

1. ADMINISTRATION UNVEILS NUTRITION PLATE TO REPLACE FOOD PYRAMID

First Lady Michele Obama has unveiled the administration’s new symbol—called MyPlate—to represent healthy eating, replacing the USDA’s food pyramid icon, which has been in use since 1992. MyPlate is a simpler image of a plate divided into the basic food groups.The plate is split into four sections: fruit, vegetables, grains and protein. A smaller circle sits beside it for dairy products.

The new design was conceived as part of Mrs. Obama’s campaign against obesity, by reminding consumers about the basics of a healthy diet. The first part of the campaign will encourage people to make half their plate fruit and vegetables. Later phases of the campaign will instruct consumers to avoid oversize portions, enjoy their food but eat less of it and drink water instead of sugary drinks.

Information about the nutrition plate can be found at www.myplate.gov.

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2. CDC’S MMWR MARKS 30 YEARS OF HIV/AIDS

June 5, 2011 marks 30 years since the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) reported the first cases of AIDS in the United States. Since then people with HIV, researchers, clinicians, allied health professionals, nonprofit organizations, government agencies, activists and many others have worked to overcome hurdles and celebrate advances in the HIV/AIDS epidemic. However, much work remains to be done to stop an epidemic that has claimed the lives of more than half a million people in the United States and more than 25 million people worldwide.

CDC’s Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention (DHAP) has created an online community to allow the public to share HIV Prevention accomplishments and challenges experienced over the last three decades.

To learn more about the 30 Years of AIDS and get involved in upcoming activities, please visit http://www.aids.gov/thirty-years-of-aids/.

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3. WHO LINKS CELL PHONE USE TO CANCER

A report released by the World Health Organization (WHO) found a link between cell phone use and glioma, a type of brain tumor that starts in the brain or spine. The report, to be published in the July 1 issue ofThe Lancet Oncologywas issued by the International Agency on Cancer Research (IACR), which reviewed close to 1,000 studies, including studies recently completed and not yet published. IACR is the WHO’s cancer panel.

While the study has generated much media attention, the National Cancer Institute and American Cancer Society have released statements noting this finding is consistent with previous studies. The classification means there could be some risk, but the evidence is not strong enough to be considered causal, and needs to be investigated further. To view the NCI statement, please visit http://ow.ly/58HqO.

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ACPM News

4.CAPITOL HILL BRIEFING FEATURES ACPM BOARD MEMBER

ACPM Board of Regents member Betsey Tilson, MD, MPH, FACPM,recently presented at a Capitol Hill briefing aimed at promoting current Medicaid care coordination programs that have proven effective at reducing costs while improving quality. The briefing, organized by the Partnership to Fight Chronic Disease (PFCD) with support from ACPM, focused on ways to alleviate challenges faced by Medicaid programs across the country as states grapple with increasing budget shortfalls.

Dr. Tilson, Medical Director of the North Carolina Community Care Program in Wake and Johnston Counties, illustrated how the program has succeeded in saving more than $700 million since 2006 while placing in the top 10 percent nationally on HEDIS measures for diabetes, asthma and heart disease when compared to commercial managed care programs.

For more information on the Capitol Hill briefing, please contact Paul Bonta atpbonta@acpm.org.

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5. ROBERT GILCHICK TO LEAD ACPM POLICY COMMITTEE

Robert Gilchick, MD, MPH, FACPM, has been appointed as the new chair of the ACPM Policy Committee! Dr. Gilchick has been a long standing member of the Policy Committee and has served the College in numerous capacities including his current role as ACPM delegate to the AMA House of Delegates where he has helped advance ACPM’s policy priorities within the House of Medicine. ACPM President Miriam Alexander, MD, MPH, FACPM, noted that Dr. Gilchick will serve as a trusted and able leader of the Policy Committee and will build on the great work achieved thus far under Jeff Gunzenhauser’s, MD, MPH, FACPM, term as chair. ACPM would like to take this opportunity to thank Dr. Gunzenhauser for his service to the committee.

For more information about the ACPM Policy Committee, please contact Paul Bonta atpbonta@acpm.org.

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6. ACPM AND AJPM PRESS BRIEFING ON BEHAVIORAL INFORMATICS AVAILABLE ONLINE

An archive of a recent ACPM and AJPM joint media briefing,Behavioral Informatics for Health, featuring ACPM representative Helga Rippen, MD, PhD, MPH, FACPM, Chief Health Information Officer and Vice President, Center for Health Information Technology, at Westat, is now available for viewing at http://behavioralinformatics.org/.The briefing, dedicated to recent advancements in behavioral informatics, marked the release of a new journal,Translational Behavioral Medicine: Practice, Policy and Research,and a special AJPM supplement on behavioral informatics.

Panelists at the briefing addressed efforts to speed the adoption and effective use of health IT to enhance the quality of care by improving the medical information available to consumers as they seek to better navigate the health care system. Other cosponsors of the media briefing include the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research (APTR),the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation(RWJ) and the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA).

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Policy and Practice

7. NUMBER OF MEASLES CASES MARKS 15 YEAR HIGH

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported 118 measles cases across the United States in 2011, the highest number of cases reported for any January-May period since 1996. The report, from the most recent Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR),indicates the median annual rate of measles was 56 cases between 2001-2008.

Transmission occurred in households, child care centers,schools, emergency departments, and at large community events. The largest outbreak occurred in Minnesota among children unvaccinated due to parental concerns about the safety of measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (MMR). At least seven infants were too young to receive MMR vaccine.

Health care providers should be on alert for potential cases due to ongoing importations of measles to the United States, including persons with a febrile rash illness (symptoms of cough, coryza, and/or conjunctivitis), who have recently traveled abroad or have had contact with travelers.

To read the full MMWR report, please visithttp://1.usa.gov/jKsK2z.

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8. NEW HEALTH BENEFIT TO ADDRESS CHILDHOOD OBESITY

With nearly 1 in 3 children and teens in the United States overweight or obese, the Alliance for a Healthier Generation is working to enhance the prevention, assessment and treatment of childhood obesity in doctors’ offices across the country. The Alliance for a Healthier Generation, a non-profit founded by the American Heart Association and William J. Clinton Foundation, launched the Healthier Generation Benefit enabling families to work with their primary care physicians and registered dietitians to achieve lifelong health.

Through the Healthier Generation Benefit, eligible children have access to at least four follow up visits with a primary care provider and four visits with a registered dietitian annually, without the requirement of a co-morbidity.

More than two million kids are already covered by the Healthier Generation Benefit, with a goal of covering more than six million young people by the end of 2012. Providers are encouraged to contact the Alliance for a Healthier Generation to learn how they can get involved. To learn more about this effort please visit www.healthiergeneration.org.

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9.HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEE SETS FY 2012 SPENDING CAP FOR HEALTH SUBCOMMITTEE

The House Appropriations Committee has released its subcommittee allocations for FY 2012 providing the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Subcommittee with $139.2 billion, a $18.2 billion (11.6 percent) decrease from FY 2011 levels. The Labor, Health and Human Services (HHS), and Education Appropriations Subcommittee is charged with developing the FY 2012 budget for HHS, which includes the Health Resources and Services Administration’s "preventive medicine and public health” line-item supporting preventive medicine residency training programs.

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10. ACPM JOINS PUSH TO SET STRONG STANDARD FOR OZONE AIR POLLUTION

ACPM joined other leading public health organizations in a sign-on letter to President Obama on ozone air pollution urging that he "direct the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to issue a strong standard to protect public health.” The letter was sent in response to EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson’s January 2010 commitment toreconsider the 2008 decision regarding the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone air pollution.

The letter specifically notes that the, "ozone health standard must protect those who are most vulnerable from the negative health impacts of ozone, including children, older adults, and those with chronic diseases. To safeguard the health of the American people, help to save lives, and reduce health care spending, we support the most protective standard under consideration: 60 parts per billion (ppb) averaged over eight hours.”

To view a copy of the letter please visit http://www.acpm.org/Ltr-OzoneStandards2011.pdf

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Research and Reports

11. STUDY ON TEEN USE OF NO-OR LOW-COST HIV TESTS

A study published in theJournal of Adolescent Healththat assessed the factors associated with acceptance of HIV testing among at-risk adolescents found thathealth policies supporting free or low-cost routine HIV testing may increase the rates of case identification in this population.Results indicated that 53.1% (n=81) of the participants (ages 15-21 years) accepted rapid HIV testing when offered to them. The study also showed race/ethnicity was a factor in acceptance of testing, with African Americans more likely to accept testing as compared to Latinos (75% vs. 39%). After controlling for race/ethnicity, participants who reporteda history of vaginal or anal intercourse with only one recent sexualpartner and who inconsistently used condoms were more likely to accept testing.

To view a copy of the report, please visit http://jahonline.org/.

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12. NEW IOM REPORT ONCHILD AND ADOLESCENT HEALTH

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) released a new study, "Child and Adolescent Health and Health Care Quality: Measuring What Matters,” that evaluates efforts to measure child and adolescent health while also measuring quality of service. The report found a lack of standardization in the following key areas:

  • Race and ethnicity,
  • Socioeconomic status,
  • Primary language spoken at home, and
  • Parental English proficiency

The lack of standardization limits the ability of those who use data to identify, monitor, and address health and health care quality among children and adolescents. The report calls for more emphasis on social and behavioral determinants of health and monitoring disparities in health and health care quality measurements.

For more information about the IOM report, please visit: http://bit.ly/e6E8Om

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13. AHRQ RELEASES PRESSURE ULCER PREVENTION TOOLKIT

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) has released a new resource, "Preventing Pressure Ulcers in Hospitals: Toolkit for Improving the Quality of Care,” to assist hospital staff in implementing effective pressure ulcer prevention practices through an interdisciplinary approach to care. Each year, more than 2.5 million people in the United States develop pressure ulcers. These skin lesions bring pain, associated risk for serious infection, and increased health care utilization.

To view the toolkit, please visithttp://1.usa.gov/igdGFa

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14. WHO RELEASES REPORT ON PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS AND THEIR IMPACT ON CHILDREN

The World Health Organization (WHO) has released a report, "”Persistent Organic Pollutants: Impact of Child Health,”to inform and educate health professionals about persistent organic pollutants (POPs), which includes pesticides and industrial chemicals manufactured during the 20th century, and their potential impact on child health and development. The document emphasizes the critical importance of primary prevention.

The international community has called for global action to reduce and eliminate release of POPs, but children continue to be exposed to these chemicals, especially in food. The WHO report summarizes current knowledge about POPs and how to reduce children's exposures to these persistent chemicals.

To view the report, please visit http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2010/9789241501101_eng.pdf.

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Announcements

15. ART AND SCIENCE OF HEALTH PROMOTION – CALL FOR PROPOSALS

The Call for Proposals is now open for the 22ndArt and Science of Health Promotion Conference. The conference will be held April 11-15, 2012 at the Manchester Hyatt in San Diego. The theme of the conference is Making Healthy Choices the Easiest Choices: Increasing Awareness, Enhancing Motivation, Building Skills, and Creating Supportive Environments. For information on deadlines and submission guidelines, please visit www.HealthPromotionConference.org

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