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ACPM Headlines 6/1/12
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In This Issue:

Top Stories

1. USPSTF releases: falls prevention; HT to prevent chronic conditions

2. ACPM asserts voice in dialogue around integrating primary care and public health

ACPM News

3. AJPM Editor-in-Chief search still active

4. ACPM accepting orders for In-Service exam

5. ACPM participates in national immunization conferences

6. ACPM offers many networking opportunities

7. Call for volunteers for 2013 PM planning committee

Policy and Practice

8. CDC recommends all baby boomers be tested for Hepatitis C

9. OMB issues FY 2014 budget guidance to government agencies

10. New recommendations advise against screening low-risk patients for lung cancer

Research and Reports

11. Lifestyle changes help reduce diabetes deaths

12. New report ranks injury prevention policies

13. Tight budgets continue to plague many local health departments

14. Less tobacco money going for cessation and prevention programs

Announcements

15. HHS announces new round of funding for community transformation grants

16. RWJF announces Young Leader awards

17. Call for proposals: 23rd Annual Art and Science of Health Promotion Conference

 

Top Stories

1. FROM THE USPSTF: PREVENTION OF FALLS IN OLDER ADULTS; AND MENOPAUSAL HORMONE THERAPY

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has released its final recommendation statement on the prevention of falls in community-dwelling older adults. The task force recommends exercise or physical therapy and vitamin D supplementation to prevent falls in community-dwelling adults aged 65 years or older who are at increased risk for falls (B recommendation). However, the task force does not recommend automatically performing in-depth multifactorial risk assessments in conjunction with comprehensive management of identified risks to prevent falls among this demographic, as the likelihood of benefit is small (C recommendation). The task force also notes that in determining whether a multifactorial risk assessment is appropriate in individual cases, patients and clinicians should consider the balance of benefits and harms on the basis of the circumstances of prior falls, comorbid medical conditions, and patient values.

To view the recommendation statement, visit http://bit.ly/KEq77B.

The task force also posted its draft recommendation statement on menopausal hormone therapy for the primary prevention of chronic conditions. The task force warns against the use of combined estrogen and progestin for the prevention of chronic conditions in postmenopausal women (D recommendation). Public comments regarding this recommendation will be accepted through June 26, 2012.

To review the recommendation and/or submit a comment, visit http://bit.ly/aF5NPd.

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2. ACPM MEETS WITH CDC OFFICIALS TO DISCUSS PRIMARY CARE AND PUBLIC HEALTH INTEGRATION

In an effort to strengthen ties and expand partnerships between ACPM and several Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offices, ACPM senior staff met with CDC officials to share the unique expertise preventive medicine physicians bring to bear in initiatives that integrate primary care and public health. The Institute of Medicine’s recent report, Primary Care and Public Health: Exploring Integration to Improve Population Health, which was co-sponsored by the CDC and Health Resources and Services Administration, served as the backdrop for several of the discussions.

ACPM executive director Mike Barry and association executive director for policy, advocacy, and external affairs Paul Bonta met on May 16 with CDC’s Office of Prevention Through Healthcare (OPTH), which is charged with leading CDC’s implementation efforts around the IOM report; the Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support (OSTLTS); and the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Discussions with OPTH ranged from potential programs to cross-train primary care physicians and health care executives in public health to increasing the uptake of clinical preventive services. Discussions with OSTLTS centered on ways ACPM might help increase the office’s capacity to reach the primary care community with public health information and education, while discussions with the Injury Center focused on the Center’s recent National Action Plan and related funding announcement.

Stay tuned for additional updates as ACPM continues to explore collaborative opportunities with CDC.

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ACPM News

3. AJPM STILL ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR EDITOR IN CHIEF

The American Journal of Preventive Medicine still is accepting applications for its next Editor-in-Chief (EIC). The initial five-year contract with the new EIC will begin January 1, 2014. AJPM, published monthly by Elsevier, is the official journal of the American College of Preventive Medicine and the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research. The journal publishes cutting-edge articles in prevention research, teaching, practice and policy. Applications are being accepted through July 1.

This position requires an individual committed to publication excellence and advancement of the field of clinical and population prevention. Applicants should have recognized expertise in the field of preventive medicine and population health, past experience on a journal editorial board, a good track record of publishing in high quality journals, excellent leadership skills, and the vision to further the success of the journal. Experience working with "new media" is particularly valuable. The announcement and full job description for the Editor-in-Chief can be obtained here. Self-nominations and nominations by third parties are welcome.

For additional information, please contact ACPM executive directorMike Barry at mbarry@acpm.org.

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4. ACPM PARTICIPATES IN NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION CONFERENCES

ACPM recently attended the 2012 National Influenza Summit "Implementing change through action: Improving influenza immunization rates” and the 2012 National Adult Immunization Summit "Partnerships in action” in Atlanta. The conferences were co-sponsored by the American Medical Association, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the National Vaccine Program Office.

Although vaccination of adults provides substantial health benefit, adult and child immunization coverage is low and well below Health People 2020 targets. The conferences convened immunization stakeholders to represent all facets of the immunization process, from manufacturers to vaccinators to advocacy groups, along with public health and policy officials. The conference focused on a number of issues including the recent health reform legislation, which focuses on prevention and provides increased access to and financing of immunizations.

ACPM was represented at the conferences by its chief development officer, Maureen Simmons.

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5. ACPM ACCEPTING ORDERS FOR THE 2012 IN-SERVICE EXAM

ACPM is now accepting orders for the 2012 Preventive Medicine In-Service examination, scheduled for July 23-August 24. This 2.25-hour electronic exam, administered annually, enables residents and program directors to determine if there are specific areas where more study and experience are needed. It is a voluntary exam that allows residents to compare themselves with other residents at the same level nationally.

Though not intended to be an examination preparation tool, the in-service exam may be used as a gauge to measure the effectiveness of residency training and preparation for the board exam. The exam is designed for residents in all specialty areas of Preventive Medicine. The material covered in the exam relates to the core (morning) portion of the American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) certification exam.

For more information and the order form, please visit: http://www.acpm.org/?inserviceexamination.

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6. ACPM OFFERS ABUNDANCE OF NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES

ACPM offers specialized resources, benefits and programs to advance your career. As an ACPM member, you will enjoy the opportunity to learn, connect and share with a collective force of professionals in preventive medicine.

Attendance at ACPM’s annual meeting and Board Review Course provides forums through which you may earn CME and MOC credits, remain current on the latest research, network with colleagues and receive information about career opportunities.

Members are also encouraged to actively participate in ACPM sections and committees. ACPM sections unite members at similar career levels into forums to share ideas, present data and examine key issues relevant to your interests. ACPM committees provide opportunities to serve in areas that promote recognition of the specialty, and enhance service to ACPM members.

To learn more about the networking opportunities available to members and how you can get involved, visit our website at www.acpm.org or contact Camille Sanders, ACPM’s membership manager at (202) 466-2044 ext. 104.

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7. PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 2013: CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS

Volunteers are needed to serve on the program planning committee for ACPM’s next annual meeting, Preventive Medicine 2013. The annual meeting will be held February 20-23 in Phoenix-Scottsdale, AZ. Participating in ACPM's planning committee is a great way to help shape next year’s premiere event in preventive medicine, earn points toward ACPM fellowship, network with colleagues, and advance the College's strategic plan!

Volunteer assignments are available in the following areas:

  • Clinical Preventive Medicine and Lifestyle Medicine Practice
  • Population Health Practice
  • Technology and Informatics
  • Career Development
  • Wellness Activities
  • Abstract Judges for poster and oral presentations

For a full description of each track and a list of suggested topics, please visit http://www.preventivemedicine2013.org/meeting-tracks.html. If you are interested serving as a planning committee volunteer, please email Haydee Barno, ACPM’s director of meetings and education, at hbarno@acpm.org.

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Policy and Practice

8. CDC RECOMMENDS BABY BOOMERS TEST FOR HEPATIS C

In draft recommendations the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) proposes one-time testing for all adults born between 1945 and 1965 (baby boomers) for identification of persons with hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronic infection. More than 2 million U.S. baby boomers are infected with HCV. Many infected baby boomers do not realize they are infected, as HCV can damage the liver with few noticeable symptoms over many years. The CDC believes that expanded screening efforts will help slow or halt disease progression and transmission, especially since new treatments can cure up to 75% of infections.

The CDC is accepting public comments regarding its recommendation through June 8, 2012. To review the recommendations and/or submit a comment, visit http://1.usa.gov/LU1Hb3.

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9. OMB ISSUES FY 2014 BUDGET GUIDANCE TO GOVERNMENT AGENCIES

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has issued the FY 2014 budget guidance to leaders of government departments and agencies. The guidance notes that FY 2014 budget requests should reflect a five-percent decrease in funding from FY 2013. Information technology costs must be reduced by ten percent. OMB also requests that agencies and departments refrain from the use of across-the-board cuts, cuts to mandatory spending, or cost shifts from other parts of the budget to reach 2014 spending level limits.

To view the OMB guidance visit http://1.usa.gov/LbgPOi.

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10. NEW GUIDELINES RECOMMEND AGAINST SCREENING LOW-RISK PATIENTS FOR LUNG CANCER

New lung cancer screening guidelines recommend annual CT scans for a select group—current or former smokers between ages 55-74—and against routine screening among other groups. These guidelines, published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), are the result of a systematic review by an expert panel from several medical groups—the American Cancer Society (ACS), the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN)—with input from the American Thoracic Society (ATS). It forms the basis for the clinical practices guidelines of the ACCP and ASCO.

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Research and Reports

11. LIFESTYLE CHANGES HELP REDUCE DIABETES DEATHS

A recent study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) reports a substantial drop in deaths among people with diabetes, particularly in connection with heart disease and stroke.

The study, published in the May issue of the journal, Diabetes Care, concludes that American adults with diabetes are more likely to die younger than those without the disease, but this the gap is decreasing. However, researchers caution that if diabetes incidence is not decreased, prevalence of the disease is likely to rise.

Factors contributing toward the decline in diabetes-related deaths include better treatment options for cardiovascular disease, improvements in diabetes management, and patients’ adaptation of healthier lifestyles. People with diabetes were found to be less likely to smoke, and more inclined toward physical activity. Improvements in the control of blood pressure and cholesterol may also be a contributor toward improving health, despite rising levels of obesity.

To read the study, please visit http://bit.ly/JurK5a.

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12. NEW REPORT RANKS STATES ON INJURY PREVENTION POLICIES

A new injury prevention report from the Trust for America’s Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) found that 24 states scored five or lower (out of a possible 10 points) based on actions that states can take to prevent injuries. For the report, The Facts Hurt: A State-By-State Injury Prevention Policy Report, states were assessed on several indicators, such as whether bicycle helmets are required for children; the existence of prescription drug monitoring programs; and whether strong laws have been enacted to prevent teen dating violence. California and New York received high scores, while Montana and Ohio were among the lowest scoring states.

Approximately 50 million Americans are medically treated for injuries each year, and more than 2.8 million hospitalized. Authors concluded that millions of injuries could be prevented each year if more states adopted additional research-based injury prevention policies and if programs were fully implemented and enforced.

To view this report, visit http://bit.ly/JAKrDI.

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13. TIGHT BUDGETS LEAD TO FURTHER PROGRAM CUTS AND JOB LOSSES AT LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENTS

A report released by the National Association of City and County Health Officials (NACCHO) found that 57 percent of all local health departments reduced or eliminated services in at least one program area in 2011, a larger percentage than in any 12-month period since the recession began. Based on a survey of 957 local health departments, clinical health services (e.g., comprehensive primary care and mental health services) was identified as the program area that was the hardest hit and the most vulnerable to cuts.

To view this report, visit http://bit.ly/KxNxgB.

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14. LESS TOBACCO MONEY GOING FOR CESSATION AND PREVENTION PROGRAMS

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) concludes that state tobacco settlement funds and higher taxes on tobacco are being used less for tobacco cessation and other related health programs. The CDC report shows that between 1998 and 2010 states collected $243.8 billion from the Master Settlement Agreement and tobacco taxes. Despite the sizable amount collected, only $8.1 billion—one dollar out of 30—was earmarked for smoking prevention and cessation programs. The amount earmarked by states is less than one-third of CDC’s recommended level.

To view the report visit http://1.usa.gov/KgzLhJ.

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Announcements

15. HHS ANNOUNCES NEW ROUND OF FUNDING FOR COMMUNITY TRANSFORMATION GRANTS

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has issued a funding opportunity announcement (FOA) for a new community transformation grant small communities program supported by the Prevention and Public Health Fund. The program will make $70 million available over two years for communities with populations of up to 500,000. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will support 25 to 50 competitive grant awards. Applicants specifically must demonstrate how they can improve the health of their communities through increasing the availability of healthy foods and beverages, improving access to safe places for physical activity, and reducing tobacco use and encouraging smoke-free environments.

To view the full FOA, visit http://1.usa.gov/L3jnm8.

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16. RWJF CELEBRATES 40 YEARS, ANNOUNCING YOUNG LEADER AWARDS

Marking its 40th year, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has established the Young Leader Awards:Recognizing Leadership for a Healthier America. Up to 10 awards will be given to young leaders, 40 years of age and under, who offer great promise for leading the way to improved health and health care for all Americans. Each winner will receive an individual award of $40,000.

Third party nominations will be accepted May 31-July 16, 2012, through a call for nominations process. ACPM fellows and members interested in being nominated, please contact ACPM member services at csanders@acpm.org or 202-466-2044.

Visit http://bit.ly/KIhGId to view award criteria.

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17. 23rdANNUAL ART & SCIENCE OF HEALTH PROMOTION CONFERENCE

The Call for Proposals is now open for the 23nd Annual Art and Science of Health Promotion Conference, March 18-22, 2013, at the Westin Hilton Head Island, in Hilton Head, SC. This year’s conference theme is "Producing the Best Health and Financial Outcomes by Using the Most Effective Health Promotion Strategies.”

To submit a proposal, visit www.HealthPromotionConference.org.

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