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ACPM Headlines 5/21/15
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In this Issue

Top Stories

1. ACPM program provides $40,000 scholarships for emerging health system leaders

2. Pan American Health Organization declares rubella eliminated in Americas

3. ACPM hosts first regional summit on Health Systems Transformation

ACPM News

4. ACPM to co-host webinar on smoking cessation

5. ACPM President-elect discusses medication adherence with LA Times

6. New Android version of AJPM mobile app is here

7. More than 1,000 individuals follow ACPM on Twitter. Do you?

8. The Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award: Erica Frank

Policy and Practice

9. Stage is set for ACPM advocacy in the Senate

10. FDA rejects RJ Reynolds petition to change smokeless tobacco warning labels

11. ACPM signs letter urging FDA to issue draft rule on use of antibiotics in agriculture

12. Task force recommends enhanced physical education in schools

Research and Reports

13. Many Americans still skipping recommended cancer screenings

14. Few people use provider data to inform health decisions

15. Faulty modeling studies led to overstated predictions of Ebola outbreak

Announcements

16. New CDC-sponsored eBook, A Story of Health, offers free CME credits

17. Webinar: Innovative medical school curricula on environmental health


Top Stories

1. ACPM PROGRAM PROVIDES $40,000 IN SCHOLARSHIP SUPPORT FOR EMERGING HEALTH SYSTEMS LEADERS

ACPM is pleased to announce a partnership with Georgetown University’s Executive MHSA Program that will provide a significant member benefit for interested members. The Executive MHSA Program is an innovative, competency-based, multidisciplinary program that grants a Master of Science in Health Systems Administration degree. ACPM members admitted into the program will be designated as ACPM Scholars and will receive $20,000 per year in direct scholarship support applied to tuition costs.

The coursework focuses on leadership and leading change,health care strategy and policy management, quality and patient safety, financial management, as well as population health areas (satisfying the graduate level competencies required by the American Board of Preventive Medicine for board certification).

The program of study is offered with both live (synchronous) and self-paced (asynchronous) online sessions to allow participation by working professionals across the country. It also includes up to two weeks of experiential coursework per year, including an in-residence experiential week on the Georgetown campus and an optional international experiential week.

The deadline for the fall 2015 program is June 30, 2015.More information about the program and its admissions requirements is available at: ExecutiveMHSA.georgetown.edu. Questions should be directed to ACPMscholars@acpm.org.


2.
PAN AMERICAN HEALTH ORGANIZATION DECLARES RUBELLA ELIMINATED IN AMERICAS

International experts at the 13th annual Vaccination Week in the Americas meeting hosted by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) declared the Americas as the first region in the world free of endemic transmission of rubella. PAHO Director Carissa F. Etienne credits this achievement to effective administration of the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine, including pioneering mass vaccination campaigns. While rubella cases still occur in the Western Hemisphere, they are considered to be imported cases from other countries. No endemic (or local origin) cases have been reported since 2009.

3. ACPM HOSTS FIRST REGIONAL SUMMIT ON HEALTH SYSTEMS TRANSFORMATION

ACPM hosted the first of three Regional Summits on Health Systems Transformation (HST) on May 12th in Sacramento, CA. ACPM convened leaders from California, Oregon, and Washington who shared their State Innovation Model award experiences and engaged in highly-interactive sessions with ACPM members, state health officials, and representatives from the private and academic sectors to share insights, exchange ideas, and learn from each other.

ACPM thanks our members for their work in helping to organize, moderate, and speak at the Western Regional Summit: Kevin Sherin, Earl Ferguson, Neal Kohatsu, Caroline Peck, and Linette Scott. A recorded webinar of the Western Regional summit will be available soon on ACPM’s website.

Don’t live on the West Coast? ACPM is hosting two additional Regional Summits in the coming weeks for members and partners to engage in HST activities: June 3 in Nashville, Tennessee; and June 18 in Albany, New York. Attendees will be able to identify innovative health systems transformation activities occurring in the surrounding region, discuss the role of population health in health systems transformation, and define the roles of public and private sector entities in health. Registration is NOW OPEN for these events and is only $30 per attendee. CME/MOC credits will be offered at each meeting. Space is limited.

These regional meetings represent one of several projects developed through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to educate, connect, and promote health systems transformation to the preventive medicine and public health community.


ACPM News

4. ACPM TO CO-HOST WEBINAR ON SMOKING CESSATION

ACPM and Partnership for Prevention are co-sponsoring a webinar entitled the Role of Healthcare Providers in Tobacco Cessation on June 17th from 2:00–3:15 p.m. Eastern Time. This webinar will address the critical role of healthcare providers in tobacco cessation within the changing health care landscape.

Expert speakers will present on: (1) the current tobacco landscape in the U.S., (2) tobacco cessation, care providers, and health system change, and (3) implementing a comprehensive tobacco cessation program in a large health system. Speakers include Brian King, PhD, Senior Scientific Advisor for Epidemiology, Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Michael Fiore, MD, Director of the University of Wisconsin Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention; and Kim Hamlett-Berry, PhD, National Public Health Director, US Department of Veteran’s Affairs.

CME/MOC credits will be offered. This program is free of charge and open to all. Registration is required.


5.
ACPM PRESIDENT-ELECT DISCUSSES MEDICATION ADHERENCE WITH THE LA TIMES

ACPM President-elect Dr. Robert (Bob) Carr was interviewed for and quoted in a recent story published in the Los Angeles Times about medication adherence. The story, "How to stick to a prescription drug regimen,” profiles the problem of poor medication adherence and its impact on patients’ health and the health care system, and informs patients of steps they can take to improve adherence.

One suggestion made in the article was for patients to print a copy of their health plan’s list of covered drugs and bring it to their next doctor's visit. Dr. Carr notes that "If the physician understands the cost structure, he or she may work with the patient to find an alternative" to expensive medications.

Side effects are another potential barrier to adherence discussed in the article. "Ask your doctor: What can I expect from this medication? What should I look for to indicate it's affecting me in an adverse way and that I should notify you and your nursing staff," Dr. Carr suggests. "The informed consumer is the best consumer."


6
.
NEW ANDROID VERSION OF AJPM MOBILE APP IS HERE

A new version of theAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine (AJPM) app is now available for android tablets and smartphones. The app remains available for the iPhone through iTunes. The upgraded functionality and new features are designed to enhance your reading and browsing experience.

With the new version, you can:

  • Browse new issues and read new Articles in Press throughout the month, or jump to the featured articles with a tap
  • Download issues while reading: no need to wait
  • Get to content you want more quickly and conveniently through enhanced layout and navigation
  • Interact with figures, tables, multimedia and supplementary content
  • Personalize your experience with My Reading List, Notes, saved articles for offline reading, sharing articles via social media, and emailing useful content

Journal Subscribers: Log in with the same username and password that grants you access to the full journal content on the American Journal of Preventive Medicine website. These credentials will allow full access to all content on the app.

Click here to download the free AJPM app from the Google Play store. Log in to read full-text articles.

Access instructions and details for Android and iPhone


7.
MORE THAN 1,000 INDIVIDUALS FOLLOW ACPM ON TWITTER. DO YOU?

Did you know that ACPM is on Twitter? More than 1,000 others do! We encourage you to join your colleagues who now follow ACPM's posts at https://twitter.com/ACPM_HQ. By following ACPM, you will have instant access to timely prevention and health care news, job postings, live tweets from ACPM events, and much more. Twitter signup is free, fast, and easy. We look forward to seeing you online!


8.
THE ARNOLD P. GOLD FOUNDATION HUMANISM IN MEDICINE AWARD: ERICA FRANK, MD, MPH, FACPM

The Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award was presented to this year’s winner, Erica Frank, MD, MPH, FACPM, during Preventive Medicine 2015 in Atlanta, GA. Dr. Frank is an educational innovator, medical researcher, and public health and climate change advocate. Since 2006, she has been a Professor and Canada Research Chair in the School of Population and Public Health and the Department of Family Practice at the University of British Columbia (UBC). Her medical specialty is Preventive Medicine, and her research emphasizes the degree to which clinicians’ positive health habits influence patients' positive health habits. Most recently, she has become known as the President and Executive Director of NextGenU.org, the world's first portal to free, accredited, higher education, including university- and graduate-level courses, which she founded in 2001.

She is a staunch advocate for public health, most notably having served on the Boards of the American College of Preventive Medicine (1997-2003) and Physicians for Social Responsibility (1998-2009, including serving as PSR’s President from 2008-2009).She has also served as a Board Member, Executive Committee member, and/or President of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, American Medical Association (AMA) Council on Long Range Planning, AMA Section on Medical Schools’ Governing Council, Association of Teachers of Preventive Medicine Foundation, Center for Policy Analysis on Trade and Health, DuPont Epidemiology Advisory Board, DuPont Health Advisory Board, and National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation.

The Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award honors outstanding achievements or contributions to Humanism in medicine. To nominate or learn more about ACPM’s Awards, visit: http://www.acpm.org/awards.


Policy and Practice

9. STAGE IS SET FOR ACPM ADVOCACY IN THE SENATE

The state is set for ACPM to advocate for its funding priorities now that the Senate Appropriations Committee has approved the FY 2016 funding allocation for its 12 separate appropriations subcommittees, including the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Subcommittee. The L/HHS/Ed subcommittee is responsible for allocating funds to most of the federal public health agencies pertinent to preventive medicine, including the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), which provides funding to preventive medicine residency training programs. ACPM is advocating for an allotment of $10 million in FY 2016 for PMR training programs, an increase of nearly $3 million over FY 2015.


10.
FDA REJECTS RJ REYNOLDS PETITION TO CHANGE SMOKELESS TOBACCO WARNING LABELS

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center for Tobacco Products, has rejected a citizen petition from R.J Reynolds Tobacco Company and American Snuff Company to change one of four smokeless tobacco warning labels. In the initial 2011 petition, they requested changing from the currently approved warning: "WARNING: This product is not a safe alternative to cigarettes.” to a revised warning based on scientific studies asserting the lessened relative risk of smokeless tobacco products compared to cigarettes: "WARNING: No tobacco product is safe, but this product presents substantially lower risks to health than smoking.”

The final decision letter rejects the petition on the grounds that the current warning is factual and not misleading, not comparable to the FDA response to a similar citizen petition, does not violate First Amendment rights, and does not present evidence that proposed warnings will promote greater public understanding.

11. ACPM SIGNS LETTER URGING FDA TO ISSUE DRAFT RULE ON USE OF ANTIBIOTICS IN AGRICULTURE

ACPM joined its partner organizations in medicine and public health on a sign-on letter to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) acting commissioner Stephen Ostroff, MD, to urge that the agency move to issue a draft rule outlining the FDA’s proposed plans to improve data collection on antibiotics used in animal agriculture.

The letter states that, "Improved data would enable FDA, producers, veterinarians, and the public to better monitor the appropriateness of use in this sector, as well as the effectiveness of FDA’s voluntary growth-promotion withdrawal policy. It has been more than two and a half years since the agency issued its advanced notice of proposed rulemaking…Detailed, publicly available information on antibiotic use is crucial to understand overuse and misuse of antibiotics and to prevent and respond to emerging resistance.”

12. TASK FORCE RECOMMENDS ENHANCED PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN SCHOOLS

The Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF), based on an extensive review of the evidence, recommends enhanced school-based physical education (PE) as an effective intervention to increase physical activity among students. Enhanced PE strategies include instructional games as well as PE lesson plans that incorporate fitness and circuit training activities. This also may include combining these programs with other school- and community-based interventions to further increase opportunities for physical activity.

The evidence reviewed indicates that students in classes with focused activity selection, class organization and management, instruction, and participation in sports activities supplemented with vigorous fitness activities spent a higher percentage of their time participating in moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity.

Research and Reports

13. MANY AMERICANS STILL SKIPPING RECOMMENDED CANCER SCREENINGS

Many Americans are not scheduling recommended screenings tests for breast, cervical and colon cancer, according to data collected from the National Health Interview Survey in 2013. The Survey, which is used to monitor the government’s goals for cancer screening, showed that a quarter of women eligible for mammograms are not getting them on time, nearly 20 percent are not getting Pap smears, and fewer than 60 percent of adults have had a recent colon cancer screening.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends specific cancer screening guidelines that are aimed at early detection and treatment to reduce death from cancer. Although colon cancer rates have been steadily declining due to colonoscopies, it remains the second leading cause of cancer death, while breast cancer remains the leading cause of death in U.S. woman. Only 58.2 percent of adults aged 50 to 75 had been screened for colorectal cancer and 72.6 percent of women aged 50 to 74 had undergone a mammogram in the past two years.

14. FEW PEOPLE USE PROVIDER DATA TO INFORM HEALTH DECISIONS

The Kaiser Family Foundation has released a poll showing that about two of three people say it is difficult to know how much physicians or hospitals charge for medical treatments or procedures. Also, roughly 1 in 5 people noted that they had seen specific cost or quality information about a hospital, insurer or physician; however, the poll found that this information rarely makes a difference.

The poll found that, "About 6 percent of people ever used quality information in making a decision regarding an insurer, hospital or doctor. And fewer than 9 percent used information about prices, most commonly in relation to health plans. Only 3 percent said they used price information about physicians.”

15. FAULTY MODELING STUDIES LED TO OVERSTATED PREDICTION OF EBOLOA OUTBREAK

Faulty computer modeling led to many inaccurate forecasts on the spread of the Ebola outbreak, with most of the predictions overstating the spread of the disease, according to a University of Michigan study. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated—based on computer modeling—that Liberia and Sierra Leone could see up to 1.4 million Ebola cases by January 2015 if the viral disease kept spreading without effective methods to contain it. Fortunately, successful interventions in West Africa helped contain the virus’ spread. On March 23, 2015, the World Health Organization released a situation update stating that there had been 24,842 Ebola cases, including 10,299 deaths, to date in Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea.

A paper published online March 31 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society suggested new ways to model disease transmission based on data from early stages of the outbreak to predict how it will unfold.


Announcements

16. NEW CDC-SPONSORED EBOOK, A STORY OF HEALTH, OFFERS FREE CME CREDITS

A Story of Health, a multi-media eBook from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)/ Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) and other partner organizations, explores the question of how disease occurs and delves into how our environments interact with our genes to influence health across the lifespan. Free Continuing Medical Education (CME) credits are available from CDC/ATSDR.

The story is told through the lives of fictional characters and their families, but features the latest scientific research about disease origin and helpful facts about disease prevention. Links to a wide range of additional resources and hundreds of scientific papers enrich each story with information one can use today to promote health and prevent disease.

Access and download A Story of Health eBook. Find out about free continuing education at: http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/emes/health_professionals/index.html.


17
.
TEACHING POPULATION HEALTH WEBINAR: INNOVATIVE MEDICAL SCHOOL CURRICULA ON ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), with support from a CDC Cooperative Agreement, is offering a free Teaching Population Health Webinar, titled Innovative Medical School Curricula on Environmental Health. The webinar will be held Tuesday, June 2, 2015, 1:00–2:00 p.m. ET.

The webinar will highlight the importance of teaching tomorrow’s doctors the ways in which the environment affects health and behavior. Featuring curriculum models and case-based activities from Harvard Medical School and University of California, San Francisco, this webinar is an opportunity for deans, faculty, and learners to understand how to better facilitate the integration of environmental health into undergraduate medical education. Attendees will be able to submit questions during an extended Q&A session. Speakers include Rose H. Goldman, MD, MPH, Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Associate Professor of Environmental Health Sciences, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health; and Robert Harrison, MD, MPH, Clinical Professor of Medicine, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine. Register Now!

 

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