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ACPM Headlines 5/8/15
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May 8, 2015

 

In this Issue

Top Stories

1. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy officially sworn in
2. Nation’s largest poultry producer to curb its use of human antibiotics
3. ACPM hosting regional summits on health system transformation

ACPM News

4. William Kane Rising Star: Samuel Peik, MD, MPH
5. Betsy Tilson receives WakeMed J. Michael Weeks award for humanitarianism
6. ACPM brings preventive medicine focus to obesity policy briefing
7. ACPM joins national sodium reduction initiative
8. ACPM signs on to Medicare Diabetes Prevention Act

Policy and Practice

9. USPSTF issues draft recommendation for smoking cessation interventions
10. HHS releases recommendations for optimal water fluoridation levels
11. HHS launches interactive training on safe opioid use

Research and Reports

12. Drinking patterns vary greatly across U.S. counties; binge drinking on the rise
13. IOM releases report on healthcare and public health collaboration
14. Seafood samples had no elevated contaminant levels from oil spill

Announcements

15. Young Physician Section seeks American Medical Association Delegate
16. IOM issues call for population health case reports
17. Art & Science of Health Promotion conference announces call for proposals
18. CDC hosting Pacific Northwest Regional Valley Fever Workshop


Top Stories

1. SURGEON GENERAL VIVEK MURTHY OFFICIALLY SWORN IN

ACPM's Director of Policy and Practice Andrea Lowe Congratulates Dr. MurthyVivek Murthy, MD, MBA, has been officially sworn in as the 19th Surgeon General by Vice President Joe Biden in a ceremony attended by ACPM staff last month. Dr. Murthy outlined three major goals for his tenure as the nation’s public health physician: combat misinformation, shift the culture of health from treatment to prevention, and eliminate damaging behaviors like smoking that are entrenched in our society.

Murthy sketched his vision for the “great American community,” in which every person can go for a walk in their community, health care providers are trained in community-based prevention, and all college campuses, federal government facilities and public housing are tobacco-free. Murthy said he will issue a call to action outlining how city planners and employers can ensure the places where people live and work promote physical activity.

2. NATION’S LARGEST POULTRY PRODUCER TO CURB ITS USE OF HUMAN ANTIBIOTICS

Tyson Foods Inc, the largest U.S. poultry producer, plans to eliminate use of human antibiotics in its chicken flocks by September, 2017. Additionally, the company noted it is working on ways to curtail such drug practices at its other protein businesses, which include pork and beef.

The move marks the latest push by the livestock and food industries to reduce the use of antibiotics in agriculture, a practice that public health officials argue spurs antibiotic-resistant superbugs in humans. 

3. ACPM HOSTS REGIONAL SUMMITS ON HEALTH SYSTEMS TRANSFORMATION

ACPM is hosting three upcoming opportunities for members and partners to engage in Health Systems Transformation (HST) activities. Regional Summits on HST will occur in California, Tennessee, and New York in May and June, 2015. Attendees will be able to identify innovative health systems transformation activities occurring in the surrounding region, discuss the role of population health in health systems transformation, and define the roles of public and private sector entities in health.

Registration is NOW OPEN for these events and is only $30 per attendee. CME/MOC credits will be offered at each meeting. Space is limited. The Western Regional Summit (Sacramento, May 12th) online registration has closed, but walk in registration is available.

These regional meetings represent one of several projects developed through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to educate, connect, and promote health systems transformation to the preventive medicine and public health community.

ACPM News

4. WILLIAM KANE RISING STAR: SAMUEL PEIK, MD, MPH

ACPM’s William Kane Rising Star Award was presented to this year’s winner, Samuel Peik, MD, MPH, during Preventive Medicine 2015 in Atlanta.  Dr. Peik has been active with ACPM since his days as a medical student.  He has served on the leadership of both the Medical Student Section and Resident Physician Section, making major contributions to the work and success of those two groups along the way.  Dr. Peik also served a rotation as the Pfizer Health Policy Resident at ACPM and since served on ACPM’s strategic planning task force, the Policy Committee, and multiple planning committees for the Preventive Medicine conference. 

Dr. Peik is a Major in the U.S. Army and Chief of the Department of Preventive Medicine at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, Fort Campbell. He also serves as the Clinical Capability Manager for Preventive and Occupational Medicine for the Army Chief Medical Informatics Officer and as the Public Health Emergency Officer for Ft. Campbell.  He holds an appointment as Associate Adjunct Faculty at the Meharry Medical College Department of Family & Community Medicine. He completed residencies in Preventive Medicine at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and in Occupational Medicine at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and received the 2011 Don Gemson Resident Award from ACPM. He is board certified in Public Health & General Preventive Medicine, Occupational & Environmental Medicine, and Clinical Informatics. He completed his MPH at Johns Hopkins University and his MD and BS at the University of Iowa.

The William Kane Rising Star Award honors a member of ACPM, who is within seven years of completion of residency training and who is certified by the American Board of Preventive Medicine. Recipients demonstrate a commitment to preventive medicine and the potential to make significant contributions to the field of preventive medicine and its organizations. Congratulations Dr. Peik!

To nominate or learn more about ACPM’s Awards, visit: http://www.acpm.org/awards. 

5. BETSEY TILSON RECEIVES WAKEMED J. MICHAEL WEEKS AWARD FOR HUMANITARIANISM

Former ACPM Board member Betsey Tilson, MD, MPH, FACPM has been awarded the WakeMed J. Michael Weeks Award for Humanitarianism. The award honors one who has devoted extraordinary time to teaching or to the care of those less fortunate; one who has participated significantly in an event which visibly demonstrates a commitment to those less fortunate; or, one who has demonstrated leadership and participation in a significant project which directly contributes to the welfare of the citizenry. The recipient of the award can be any member of the WakeMed hospital family who has distinguished him or herself for service to humanity.

ACPM congratulates Dr. Tilson on her award!

6. ACPM BRINGS PREVENTIVE MEDICINE FOCUS TO OBESITY POLICY BRIEFING

ACPM member Dr. Scott Kahan, MD, MPH, spoke on behalf of the College at a policy briefing on addressing the cost of obesity in the aging population. The briefing, sponsored by CQ Roll Call and the Gerontological Association, brought together health leaders and members of Congress to examine the main drivers of obesity in the aging population and discuss solutions that would ease the health and economic burden for patients and families. Dr. Kahan serves at the Director of the National Center for Weight and Wellness in Washington, DC, and serves as a Faculty Member at the John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

7. ACPM JOINS NATIONAL SODIUM REDUCTION INITIATIVE

ACPM has joined the national collaborative sodium reduction initiative, What’s Shaking? Creative Ways to Boost Flavor with Less Sodium, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).  The aim of this initiative is to engage schools, as well as parents, teachers, and community members, in a collaborative effort to reduce sodium in school meals.

To help our nation's children meet the recommended sodium intake, USDA has released sodium standards (sodium targets) for the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program. The first sodium target went into effect during school year 2014-15. Additional sodium targets will take place in future school years, so student palates can slowly adjust to new flavors, while we continue to improve the dietary intake of our nation's schoolchildren. More information about the sodium targets, including specific amounts for each target period and grade group, can be found at: http://www.fns.usda.gov/sites/default/files/sodium.pdf.

The overarching goals of this initiative are to:

  • Ensure schools meet the school meals sodium target 1,

  • Increase awareness of the need for dietary sodium reduction,

  • Expand the number of sodium reduction resources available to schools while concurrently increasing their utilization of these resources, and

  • Highlight activities in the private and nonprofit sectors that are helping schools achieve the new sodium targets. 

In the United States today, children ages 6-18 years consume approximately 3,300 mg of sodium per day, not including salt that is added at the table. This is far greater than the 2,300 mg of sodium per day recommended in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010.

 

8. ACPM SIGNS ON TO MEDICARE DIABETES PREVENTION ACT

ACPM joined partner organizations in medicine and public health on a sign-on letter to Congress expressing support for the “Medicare Diabetes Prevention Act of 2015.”  The legislation calls on Medicare to provide coverage of the National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP) for individuals at risk of developing the disease.

The letter states that, “with access to appropriate interventions and information, diabetes can very often be prevented, even in those at the highest risk, and providing Medicare coverage for the National DPP will help seniors avoid diabetes and other chronic illness.  Avalere Health estimates the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Act will save the federal government $1.3 billion over 10 years. Providing coverage for this proven and cost-effective prevention program is the type of solution Congress must support as our nation seeks to control healthcare spending while improving the health of older Americans.”

Policy and Practice

9. USPSTF ISSUES DRAFT RECOMMENDATION FOR SMOKING CESSATION INTERVENTIONS

The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has issued a draft recommendation statement and a draft evidence review for tobacco smoking cessation interventions in adults and pregnant women. The draft recommendation statement recommends (Grade A) clinicians ask all adults and pregnant women about tobacco use and provide U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmacotherapy for non-pregnant adults or behavioral interventions for all adults and pregnant women that use tobacco. The statement also concluded insufficient evidence (Grade I) is available to assess the balance of benefits and harms of pharmacotherapy interventions in pregnant women as well as electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) for tobacco cessation.

The draft evidence review analyzed 54 systematic reviews of the effectiveness and safety of pharmacotherapy and behavioral tobacco cessation interventions among adults, pregnant women, and those with mental health conditions. The review concludes that behavioral interventions and pharmacotherapy are effective interventions for reducing the rate of smoking in adults. 

The draft recommendation statement and evidence review are open for public comment through June 1st at 8:00 pm EDT. 

10. HHS RELEASES RECOMMENDATIONS FOR OPTIMAL WATER FLUORIDATION LEVELS

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has announced its final recommendation for a fluoride concentration of 0.7 mg/L in drinking water to prevent tooth decay. This recommendation updates the earlier U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) guidance that ranged from 0.7-1.2 mg/L.  More information, scientific basis, and public comments on this recommendation are published in Public Health Reports’ “U.S. Public Health Service Recommendation for Fluoride Concentration in Drinking Water for the Prevention of Dental Caries.” 

11. HHS LAUNCHES INTERACTIVE TRAINING ON SAFE OPIOID USE

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has released Pathways to Safer Opioid Use, an immersive, interactive training tool designed using the opioid-related recommendations outlined in HHS’ National Action Plan for Adverse Drug Event Prevention.

In this web-based training, users assume the identity of four playable characters—a pharmacist, nurse, physician, and patient. Each of the four playable characters faces key decision points and users are able to make decisions for them; based upon the decisions, the storyline branches to different pathways and outcomes. By demonstrating the decisions that health care teams face, the potential outcomes of their choices, and strategies for overcoming barriers, this behavior-based training demonstrates best practices in safe opioid use and ADE prevention.

To launch the continuing medical education (CME) course visit: http://health.gov/hcq/training.asp#pathways

 

Research and Reports

12. DRINKING PATTERNS VARY GREATLY BY COUNTY; BINGE DRINKING ON THE RISE

There are significant differences between U.S. counties in both the amount of alcohol use (any drinking, heavy drinking, and binge drinking) and proportion of heavy/binge drinkers within a county, according to an article by researchers at the University of Washington published in the American Journal of Public Health. However, “Drinking Patterns in US Counties from 2002-2012 did find that heavy and binge drinking has increased in most counties between 2005-2012.

Recommendations from the article include using this data as an aid in designing and implementing targeted alcohol abuse interventions as well as monitoring county-level progress over the years.

13. IOM RELEASES REPORT ON HEALTHCARE AND PUBLIC HEALTH COLLABORATION

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has released a Workshop in Brief report summarizing the “Opportunities at the Interface of Health Care and Public Health” meeting on February 5th in Washington, DC. The goal of the event was to understand how collaboration can facilitate action to achieve more meaningful solutions to public health issues.

Collaboration Between Health Care and Public Health—Workshop in Brief” features the workshop presentations and case studies on payment reform, CDC/CMS Million Hearts campaign, asthma, and the importance of collaboration to create effective integration.

14. SEAFOOD SAMPLES HAD NO ELEVATED CONTAMINANT LEVELS FROM OIL SPILL

A sampling of more than 1,000 Gulf of Mexico fish, shrimp, oysters, and blue crabs taken from Cedar Key, Florida, to Mobile Bay, Alabama, between 2011 to 2013 shows no elevated contaminant levels, according to a seafood safety study conducted by researchers at the University of Florida. In fact, some 74 percent of the seafood tested showed no quantifiable levels of oil contaminants at all.

“Seafood appears as safe to eat now as it was before the spill,” said Dr. Andrew Kane, the study’s lead author at the UF College of Public Health and Health Professions. The study showed that contaminant levels were safe even for “high-end consumers,” which was determined by coupling contaminant data from sampled seafood with seafood consumption data from coastal residents who participated in the UF study.

Following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in 2010, many people were concerned that seafood was contaminated by either the oil or dispersants used to keep the oil from washing ashore. Those concerns were still present during a study three years later conducted by UF for the Healthy Gulf, Healthy Communities Project, funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

Announcements

15. YOUNG PHYSICIAN SECTION SEEKS AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION DELEGATE

ACPM is seeking an American Medical Association (AMA) Young Physician Section (YPS) Delegate.  The delegate acts as a liaison between ACPM and the AMA.  The delegate is required to be an AMA member and attend the semi-annual AMA YPS meetings.  There is no financial assistance to attend the meetings.  If interested please email acpmyps@gmail.com.

16. IOM ISSUES CALL FOR POPULATION HEALTH CASE REPORTS

The IOM Roundtable on Population Health Improvement recently created a collaborative on bridging public health and health care, which is soliciting “population health case reports” describing efforts that build bridges between the clinical and the population-based sectors—and that may involve other sectors as well—to improve health.  Case reports that illustrate meaningful linkages between clinical medicine and population-based efforts to improve health, such as collaborations between health systems and state and local public health agencies, are encouraged.

17. ART & SCIENCE OF HEALTH PROMOTION CONFERENCE ANNOUNCES CALL FOR PROPOSALS

The Call for Proposals is now open for the 26th Annual Art and Science of Health Promotion Conference.  The conference will be held April 25-29, 2016, in Orlando, Florida with the theme: “What is the Purpose of Health Promotion?  Money, Health, or More?” The deadline for Breakout Presentation submissions is July 31; for Art & Science Presentations and Activity Sessions, October 30; and for Poster Presentations and “Making Connections” submissions,  September 25-March 11.

To apply, visit: http://healthpromotionconference.com/2016_CFP.  Contact Patti Weber, Vice President of Marketing, at the American Journal of Health Promotion with any questions at 248-425-2737 or by email at patti.weber@healthpromotionjournal.com.

18. CDC HOSTING PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGIONAL VALLEY FEVER WORKSHOP

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is hosting a Pacific Northwest Coccidioides & Coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) Workshop on May 27th and 28th in partnership with the Washington, Idaho, and Oregon Departments of Health.  This two-part workshop in Kennewick, WA features an evening technical session on May 27th targeting health professionals, public health practitioners, and veterinarians by providing education on C. immitis to improve diagnosis and case reporting. On May 28th, the CDC and its partners will host a full-day surveillance planning session for its public health partners, workgroup members, and CDC staff to help develop these partnerships for human, veterinary, and environmental surveillance.

 

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