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ACPM Headlines 4/9/12
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In This Issue:

 

Top Stories

1. IOM report addresses integration of primary care and public health

2. ACPM ED signs letter to Obama and Congress in support of Prevention Fund

3. County Health Rankings released

ACPM News

4. Resident Physician Section election results are in!

5. ACPM submits House testimony in support of PMR funding and NVDRS

6. ACPM joins letter in support of funding for CDC’s environmental health center

7. ACPM joins letter in support of FY 13 funding for Title VII programs

Policy and Practice

8. FDA requires tobacco companies to report all harmful substances

9. CDC recommends more intensive chlamydia screening for women

10. Report shows importance of calculating full cost savings of obesity prevention

Research and Reports

11. Cancer death rates have declined since the early 1990s

12. Medical injections pose risk for Hepatitis B and C transmission

13. Autism is being diagnosed in more children and at younger ages

Announcements

14. 2013–14 Australian–American Health Policy Fellowship application open

15. Members in the news: Varkey

16. ACPM says farewell to Maya Nath

 

Top Stories

1. IOM: FEDERAL AGENCIES SHOULD GROW WORKFORCE NEEDED TO INTEGRATE PRIMARY CARE AND PUBLIC HEALTH

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) should join forces to develop the workforce needed to support the integration of primary care and public health, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. Among the actions recommended by the committee that wrote the report, CDC and HRSA should work with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on graduate medical education financing options that give priority to training providers in public health settings.

For this report, sponsored by CDC, HRSA, and the United Health Foundation, the IOM examined the integration of primary care and public health and identified a set of core principles that can serve as a roadmap to move the nation toward a more efficient health system. The committee’s review of published papers as well as case studies in specific cities showed that successful integration of primary care and public health requires community engagement to define and tackle local population health needs; leadership that bridges disciplines and jurisdictions and provides support and accountability; shared data and analyses; and sustained focus by partners.

ACPM provided testimony before the committee early in its deliberation process.

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2. ACPM CALLS ON PRESIDENT OBAMA TO PROTECT THE PREVENTION AND PUBLIC HEALTH FUND

ACPM executive director Michael Barry joined nearly 100 other chief executives of health organizations on a letter to President Obama "to express our deep disappointment in your Administration’s support for reducing the investment in the Prevention and Public Health Fund (Fund). The proposed cut to the Fund in your FY 2013 budget helped pave the way for the $6.25 billion cut that was included in HR 3630, the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act, which you signed into law in February. This represents an enormous step backward in our commitment to prevention and compromises our ability to make progress on cost containment, public health modernization, and wellness promotion. We urge you to publicly state your commitment to oppose any future cuts in the Fund.”

ACPM has been working diligently with its colleagues in medicine and public health to protect the fund from efforts to divert dollars toward non-prevention and public health programs. The challenging fiscal environment has made the fund prone to attack from lawmakers seeking funds for other uses.

To view of copy of the letter, visit http://bit.ly/HeFqpD.

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3. COUNTY HEALTH RANKINGS SHOW HUGE GEOGRAPHIC DIFFERENCES IN HEALTH

For the third consecutive year, the University of Wisconsin and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation have jointly published the County Health Rankings, which measure the health of every county in the United States as well as those factors that influence health, outside of the doctor’s office. The Rankings show that, within states and across the nation, there are big differences in health and the factors that influence health.

Across the nation, some factors that influence health, such as smoking, availability of primary care physicians, and social support, show highs and lows across all regions. Other factors—such as excessive drinking rates, rates of teen births, unemployment rates, and motor vehicle crash deaths—reflect distinct regional patterns.

The Rankings consider factors that affect people’s health within four categories: health behavior, clinical care, social and economic factors, and physical environment. The Rankings illustrate how factors such as education, income, access to healthy foods, and air quality play a major role with respect to how long and how well people live. This year’s Rankings include several new measures, such as how many fast food restaurants are in a county and levels of physical inactivity among residents. Graphs illustrating premature death trends over 10 years are new as well.

The Rankings are published online at http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/.

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ACPM News

4. NEW RESIDENT PHSYICIAN SECTION GOVERNING COUNCIL ELECTED

The ACPM Resident Physician Section is pleased to introduce the new Governing Council:

  • Elizabeth Salisbury-Afshar, MD, MPH - President
  • Raul Mirza, MS, DO, MPH - Executive Vice President
  • Sarah-Blythe Ballard, MD, MPH - Vice President for Policy and Education
  • Laura Sander, MD - Vice President for Membership and Recruitment
  • Karyn Singer, MD - Secretary/Treasurer

Congratulations to the new officers! For more information on the new Governing Council, visit http://www.acpm.org/?RPS_Officers.

ACPM would like to thank the outgoing members of the RPS Governing Council for their outstanding service: Jeff Tzeng, DO; Ashley Maltz, MD; Aisha Rivera, MD; and Michael Crupain, MD.

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5. ACPM SUBMITS CONGRESSIONAL TESTIMONY IN SUPPORT OF PM RESIDENCY TRAINING AND CDC’S NVDRS PROGRAM

ACPM recently submitted congressional testimony to the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education requesting $5 million for preventive medicine residency training programs and $5 million for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) in FY 2013 funding. Current funding is $2.8 million and $3.5 million respectively. Proposed FY 2013 funding levels will not be announced until the full House Appropriations Committee meets to consider the FY 2013 Labor, Health and Human Services and Education appropriations bill later this summer.

The Senate appropriations process is again lagging behind the House process. ACPM will submit similar testimony to the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education in support of both programs later this month.

To view the testimony in support of funding for preventive medicine residency training programs, visit http://bit.ly/IgAFHm.

To view the testimony in support of funding for NVDRS, visit http://bit.ly/HSdn8L.

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6. ACPM JOINS LETTER IN SUPPORT OF NATIONAL CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

ACPM joined several organizations on a sign-on letter to House and Senate appropriators to express concern over the continued decline in funding for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH). The letter noted that, "Since fiscal year 2009, NCEH funding has been cut approximately 25 percent. These spending reductions have occurred at a time when we must strengthen our efforts to understand and address the environmental causes of injury, infectious disease, and chronic illness. Meanwhile, chronic disease rates continue to climb, inflicting the burden of preventable death and illness on millions of Americans and contributing to the growing cost of health care.”

To view a copy of the letter, visit http://bit.ly/IrigGQ.

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7. ACPM JOINS LETTER TO APPROPRIATORS URGING INCREASED FUNDING FOR TITLE VII AND VIII PROGRAMS

As members of the Health Professions, Nursing and Education Coalition (HPNEC), ACPM joined nearly 60 medical organizations on a letter to House and Senate appropriators urging an increase of $20 million in FY 2013 funding to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to expand support for Title VII and Title VIII programs. HRSA’s Title VII programs include the preventive medicine residency training grant program that currently provides nearly $3 million in support for a handful of residency training programs.

The letter noted that, "Since 1963, the programs have demonstrated effectiveness in preparing the health care workforce to adapt and respond to the country’s changing needs. As the only federal programs focused on filling the gaps in the supply of health professionals not met by traditional market forces, insufficient funding for Title VII and VIII will aggravate challenges in boosting the supply of primary care practitioners, increasing diversity of the workforce, and improving the distribution of health professionals.”

To view a copy of the coalition letter, visit http://bit.ly/Hn5MyI.

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Policy and Practice

8. FDA TO REQUIRE TOBACCO COMPANIES TO REPORT ALL HARMFUL SUBSTANCES

A preliminary guidance released for comment by the Food and Drug Administration will require tobacco companies to report quantities of harmful and potentially harmful constituents (HPHCs) associated with cancer, lung disease and other health problems found in tobacco products. FDA established a list of 93 HPHCs that tobacco companies will be required to report for every regulated tobacco product sold in the U.S., though the agency is only focusing on 20 for the coming year. Constituents or byproducts of tobacco products that are subject to the new rule include ammonia, carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. The FDA will require companies to display the information in a consumer-friendly format by next April.

The FDA is accepting comments on the draft guidance through June 4, 2012. To read the draft and learn how to submit comments, visit http://1.usa.gov/H76W1c.

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9. CDC RECOMMENDS MORE INTENSIVE CHLAMYDIA SCREENING FOR WOMEN

The CDC has recommended that physicians retest chlamydia patients 25 and younger three months after treatment to ensure that the person has not been re-infected. While CDC has recommended annual chlamydia screening for all sexually active women 25 and younger, according to the agency annual chlamydia screening alone is not enough to slow or stop the increase of new infections among these women each year.

Young, sexually active women have an increased risk of developing chlamydia, but according to data released in March at the CDC’s National STD Prevention Conference in Minneapolis, physicians often overlook chlamydia screening among these women. The conference focused on advances and challenges in efforts to halt the spread of STDs.

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10. REPORT TOUTS NEED TO CALCULATE FULL COST SAVINGS OF OBESITY PREVENTION

A new report funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation examines the underlying problems in justifying spending to prevent obesity. In Assessing the Economics of Obesity and Obesity Interventions authors found that cost estimates of legislative proposals use a time period too short to capture the potential economic value of preventing diseases linked to obesity.

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO), which judges the costs and benefits of federal legislation, currently conducts its projections over a 10-year period. Cost estimates for legislative proposals to address obesity use a time period that is too short to capture the potential economic value of preventing related diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease, according to a report by the Campaign to End Obesity. The report concludes that this limits policy makers’ ability to consider effective policies to address these costly health conditions.

To read the full report, visit: http://bit.ly/GIwSTL

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Research and Reports

11. CANCER DEATH RATES HAVE DECLINED

According to the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer from 1975 to 2008, death rates from all cancers combined for men, women, and children continued to decline in the United States between 2004 and 2008. The incidence, or overall rate of new cancer diagnoses, among men decreased by an average of 0.6 percent per year between 2004 and 2008. Overall cancer incidence rates among women declined 0.5 percent per year from 1998 through 2006 and leveled off from 2006 through 2008. To read the report posted online in the journal CANCER, visit http://1.usa.gov/H1nQSH.

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12. MEDICAL INJECTIONS POSE RISKS FOR HEPATITIS B AND C TRANSMISSION

Healthcare exposures may represent an important source of new HBV and HCV infections among older adults, according to a new study from the journal Hepatology. The report identifies medical injections as a potential risk factor for having Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C infection.

A recent Annals of Internal Medicine editorial highlights how unsafe injection practices and other infection control breaches result in transmission of Hepatitis C virus. The column discusses the need for the national One&Only Campaign led by the CDC and the Safe Injection Practices Coalition to promote safe injection practices and describes the increasing role of public health departments in healthcare-associated infection prevention.

To learn more about the One&Only Campaign and the new Health Department Toolkit, visit:http://www.oneandonlycampaign.org/

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13. AUTISM BEING DIAGNOSED IN MORE CHILDREN, AND EARLIER, IN THE U.S.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 1 in 88 children in the United States has been identified as having an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a new study that looked at data from 14 communities. The report, Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders – Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, 14 Sites, United States, 2008, also shows more children are being diagnosed by age 3, an increase from 12 percent for children born in 1994 to 18 percent for children born in 2000.

To learn more about this study, visit www.cdc.gov/autism.

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

14. 2013–14 AUSTRALIAN–AMERICAN HEALTH POLICY FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION OPEN

The Australian–American Health Policy Fellowship offers a unique opportunity for outstanding, mid-career U.S. professionals—academics, government officials, clinical leaders, decision-makers in managed care and other private health care organizations, and journalists—to spend up to 10 months in Australia conducting research and working with leading Australian health policy experts on issues relevant to both countries.

For a fellowship of 10 months, an award of up to $87,000 (AUD), which includes round-trip airfare to Australia, a monthly stipend, and project-related travel, will be provided—plus additional allowances for partners and/or children.

The deadline for receipt of applications for the 2013–14 fellowship is August 15, 2012. For further information and to obtain an application, see http://www.commonwealthfund.org/Fellowships.aspx.

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15. MEMBERS IN THE NEWS: VARKEY

Congratulations to ACPM Fellow Dr. Prathibha Varkey for her appointment as Professor of Medicine and Professor of Preventive Medicine at Mayo Medical School.

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16. ACPM BIDS FAREWELL TO MAYA NATH

ACPM regrettably says goodbye to Maya Nath, who is resigning from the ACPM staff after more than five years of dedicated service to ACPM as a project coordinator/manager, mainly in the education area. Maya joined the College in late 2006 and has made numerous contributions to ACPM’s adolescent health and environmental health education programs, the College’s annual meeting, and ACPM’s Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program.

Among her many accomplishments, she established ACPM’s Scientific Review Committee as a key fixture supporting the College’s Preventive Medicine conference and steered ACPM’s MOC program from its infancy to a major program area within the College, adeptly serving the MOC needs of ACPM members and ABPM diplomates. Her creativity, innovation, and dedication to serving the members will be sorely missed. Maya’s last day is April 12. Please join us in wishing Maya farewell and best of luck in her future endeavors.

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